NEWS:

The President of ILC-BR, Alexandre Kalache, is currently in Australia advancing the ageing agenda of the South Australian Government.

He delivered a public lecture to a packed audience at the University of South Australia's Hawke Centre on November 21st. His presentation called for an education revolution to better accomodate the seismic changes brought about by the Longevity Revolution and the 4th Industrial Revolution. He made a passionate appeal for a paradigm shift away from knowledge-conveying instruction to learning for personal development and the release of creative potential. He stressed the need for learning to learn and firmly establishing Life-long Learning as the organising principle for education in the 21st Century.

The podcast is available on the Hawke Centre site: http://www.unisa.edu.au/Business-community/Hawke-Centre/Events-calendar/Creating-an-Education-Revolution-that-places-life-long-Learning-at-its-core-/

In the photo from the left to the right: Jeanette Walters (Director of Inter-governmental Relations & Ageing), Hon. Zoe Bettison (SA Minister of Ageing), Alexandre Kalache and Natalie Forde (University of SA)

On Tuesday, October 24, 2017, the Columbia Aging Center celebrates the participants in its digital narrative project “Exceeding Expectations” (exceedingexpectations.nyc). 

Since its start, 20 people in their 80s have shared their remarkably different lives with Ruth Finkelstein and Dorian Block’s team through words, photos and video. On Tuesday, Oct. 24, they will meet each other for the first time in New York, and we will reveal what we’ve learned.

To read the stories and see videos, visit the project’s website: exceedingexpectations.nyc.

Attachment: Program announcement.

Written by Caitlin M.Hawke

Documents:

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The Columbia Aging Center has been following 20 older New Yorkers for two years with the aim of disrupting stereotypes of aging and portraying everyday life. Many of the 20 New Yorkers met for the first time on Oct. 24.

“Too often journalists do a terrible job reporting on this stage of life,” Dorian Block, a journalist and co-lead on the project, said at the event. “They often portray older adults as pitiful, powerless, and static. And when not that, they’re heroes: skydiving at age 100 or being asked to impart the single secret to long life. Our goal was to show the everyday lives of older people.”

At the start of the project, in 2014, Exceeding Expectations participants had lived at least 81 years, the average life expectancy for New Yorkers. Through visits over many months, Block and a team of photographers and students embedded in their lives, bearing witness to their subjects’ ups and downs. The resulting stories, lavishly illustrated with photos and videos, appear on the project’s website and in the work of media partners.

“As we move through our lives, we get more different from one another over time,” added Ruth Finkelstein, interim co-director of the Columbia Aging Center who conceived the project with Block. “By the time we grow older, we’re really, really individuated.” Exceeding Expectations, Finkelstein added, aims to be true to all “the wondrous diversity of people who achieve old age.”

Among those profiled are Chandrakant Sheth, an Indian-American living in Sunnyside, Queens, who struggled with loneliness after his wife died; Manhattan residents George Blomme and Doug McClure, a longtime gay couple who want to get married; and Otto Neals, an African-American artist in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, grappling with what will happen to his artwork after he dies.

Visit www.exceedingexpectations.nyc to see photos, video and stories from the project.

By Timothy Paul (excerpted from the full article here: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/public-health-now/news/honest-look-growing-old-new-york)

On October 17, ILC-BR organized a Symposium with three international speakers in São Paulo. The event took place in the auditorium of Iamspe (Institute for Medical Assistance to the Public Servant of the State of São Paulo).

ILC-BR organized for the first time the International Longevity Symposium to celebrate five years of the International Longevity Forum, which occurs annually in Rio de Janeiro. This was also a response to the increasing demand by professionals to have a similar initiative in São Paulo. The event was very well attended by health professionals and students from various backgrounds.

Just as the International Longevity Forum, the Symposium focussed around the development of resilience along the life course. Two of the speakers presented innovative practices from abroad: Gabrielle Kelly shared her experience of establishing the Resilience and Wellbeing Centre in South Australia and provided an insight into the methodologies used to teach resilience to various population groups. The Centre, located within the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), incorporates Dr Martin Seligman's PERMA dashboard (Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning and Accomplishment) PLUS, Physical Activity, Nutrition, Sleep and Optimism, to measure and teach resilience and wellbeing. Gabrielle presented evidence on how to build positive mental health and wellbeing throughout the life course.

Next, the Dutch nurse Jos de Blok, founder of the quickly expanding community care model Buurtzorg, spoke about the origins, functioning and impact of Buurtzorg, which started ten years ago. Buurtzorg is a holistic response to the problems in the Dutch health care system, which in the way it went 10 years ago was going to be unsustainable. According to Jos, the strength of Buurtzorg, which has already expanded to countries on all continents, comes from nurses who should feel empowered to deliver care and not managed top-down. He further says that the best result expected is a patient that does not need the care any longer. It is about empowering the patient and connecting informal care systems, instead of focusing all efforts on formal and expensive care.

Last, the Spanish sociologist Daniel Prieto Sancho spoke about resilience from a conceptual point of view, making special reference to the context of care. He questioned the principle and goal of independence, suggesting that very few privileged people can actually be independent and that other than that we are all interdependent. He concludes that resilience results of a collective process.

The Symposium counted on the support of Iamspe, Health Holland and the University of the Third Age of the University of São Paulo, as well as Bradesco Seguros.

Contact: Ina Voelcker, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

Photo: audience of the Symposium (credit: Ina Voelcker)

Simpósio Internacional Longevidade by ILC-UK on Scribd

 

On October 19 and 20, ILC-BR hosted the 5th International Longevity Forum in Rio de Janeiro. This year’s theme was the construction of resilience along the life course; a very timely topic given the ongoing crisis in Brazil.

Resilience can be taught and learnt across the life course – this is one of the take away messages of the 5th International Longevity Forum which brought together about 30 national and international speakers from various fields, ranging from architecture and arts, demography and nursing, to medicine and psychology. The discussions focussed on the multidimensionality of ageing from a life-course perspective and on how individual and community resilience can be developed – in the context of the most privileged circumstances and the most adverse context, such as care settings in poor communities.

International speakers were Dr. Ali Naghieh of Oxford University; Gabrielle Kelly of the Resilience and Wellbeing Centre of South Australia; the German architect Matthias Hollwich, author of “New Aging”, Jos de Blok, founder of Buurtzorg; Prof. Dr. Karen Glaser of King’s College London and Prof. Dr. Volker Deville of the Berlin Demography Forum. Perspectives from Spain and Argentina were added through the participation of Dr. Daniel Prieto, Dr. Silvia Gascon and Dr. Ricardo Iacub. The representative of the GA at the UN in Geneva, Silvia Perel-Levin also participated discussing the role of human rights and presenting on the Theatre of the Oppressed.

As every year, the Forum was held in the auditorium of Bradesco Seguros, one of Brazil’s biggest insurance company. Further support for the Forum was provided by Universeg, TENA, MSD Pharmaceuticals, Health Holland, Iamspe and the Brazilian Society for Geriatrics and Gerontology (SBGG).

Contact: Ina Voelcker, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

 

Picture: audience of the Forum (Photo credit: Marcos Pinto)

On October 5, ILC-BR organized a seminar to discuss the importance of vaccination across all ages. The seminar was held at Iamspe, the Institute for Medical Assistance for Public Servants of the State of Sao Paulo.

Despite rapid population ageing in Brazil, there still is a misconception that “vaccines are for kids”. This leads to a huge loss of opportunity to improve the health of a population, which is ageing quickly. Today in Brazil, there are 47 million people aged 50 and over – the equivalent to the total population of Spain. In the next 30 years, this number will double and as such pass the current number of the population of Germany. This shows the potential of the impact of adult vaccination.

To discuss this topic, ILC-BR brought together four experts of different backgrounds. The first speaker, Dr. Helena Sato of the University of Sao Paulo (USP) and Member of the Technical Committee of the National Immunization Programme, provided the vision of a specialist. The vice-President of the Brazilian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SBGG), Dr. Carlos André Uehara discussed the topic as a geriatrician working in primary health care. Dr. Maisa Kairalla, President of the São Paulo’s section of the SBGG discussed vaccinations as an ally for healthy ageing and ILC-BR’s board member and professor in public health at USP, Marília Louvison spoke about immunization as a public health measure. After the presentations, Alexandre Kalache moderated a debate with the experts.

The seminar was organized with sponsorship of MSD and support of Iamspe and the University of the Third Age of the University of São Paulo (USP).

ILC-I, as UN INIA's Satellite Centre for the SAARC region is glad to announce that the admission for the United Nations' International Institute on Ageing, Malta's (UN INIA) Certificate Course on "Social Gerontology" is now open.

This Certificate Course is to be held from the 4th to 8th of December 2017 at the campus of Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Hyderabad, Telangana, India, and is in collaboration with ILC-I (as UN INIA's Satellite Centre for the SAARC Region) and TISS.

This course is open to only SAARC nationals.

For admissions please visit ILC-India website : www.ilcindia.org

Attached: the Flyer for the course.

 

Written by ANJALI RAJE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ILC-I.

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ILC – Australia symposium, Session 3385 6.00-7.30pm, IAGG 2017 - San Francisco
This symposium invited researchers, service providers, and advocacy organizations to consider changes in housing in late life, and how housing affects people’s access to care as they age.

Individuals, service providers, and governments share a common goal to enable older people to remain at home for as long as possible. However, many older people need, or choose, to move to smaller or more supportive accommodation as they age and as they encounter changes in their needs and capacities. This symposium discussed housing needs of older people, age friendly housing options, and how housing affects access to community supports and services. The symposium considered increasing risk of homelessness among older people, and how the care needs of these people can be met. The discussion had a particular focus on the needs of women, single older men, and people with precarious housing tenure.

Participants

Julie Byles, Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle
Angela Herd, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Helen Barrie, Australian Population and Migration Research Centre, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
2. Australian Association of Gerontology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Claudia Meyer (presenting on behalf of Di Goeman), RDNS Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Victoria Cornell, AHURI Postdoctoral Fellow. School of Social Sciences. University of Adelaide.
 

Attachemnt: Summary of the symposium

Written by: Julie Byles Julie.byles@newcastle.edu.au

Documents:

Summary of the symposium ()

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In July, Dr Alex Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil and Co-President of the Global Alliance, participated in a debate with Dr Anne Karpf, author of 'How to Age' and Prof Lynda Gratton, author of 'The 100 Year Life' for the BBC World Service.

The BBC World Service produced a News Hour Extra on increasing longevity. Owen Bennett Jones discussed with his guests, Dr Alex Kalache, Dr Anne Karpf and Prof Lynda Gratton if increasing longevity is a blessing or curse. The three experts, who overall see increasing longevity as a triumph of humanity, alerted that there is huge inequality in life expectancy between and within countries.

Amongst others, Dr Kalache raised the issue of long-term care and the question of care being a responsibility of the family or not. He recommends, “if you want to be well treated in older age, don’t be racist, because you are going to be surrounded by brown and black faces in the last stages of your life”.

To sum up the programme, Dr Kalache also mentions the importance of understanding and responding to the 4th Industrial Revolution and the impact it will have on our each time longer lives in the future. In his opinion, lifelong learning is one of the essential capitals we need to have to deal with the challenges arising from these global trends.

Listen to the full 50 minute programme on: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p058m10c

 

Picture: Dr Alex Kalache (credits: Viviane Menescal)

Contact: Ina Voelcker, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

 

On June 28, 2017, Senior Planet in New York held an all-day session titled “Hack Aging.” The event, designed by Debbie Galant, was attended by approximately 80 persons. Muriel Beach led a group focused on the problem of negative concepts of aging (which Dr. Robert Butler called ageism) and won the First Place for the group and a special award, “Personality Plus” for herself.

Muriel reports: “I selected to work with a group on identity. How to solve the problem of negative concepts of aging. Yes, Bob Butler called it ageism. Development of the dynamics of the group,  total strangers, taking each other's ideas and building on them was mind blowing. We worked for hours and then each group made a presentation to the whole room and some judges. Our group won and we have cups stating First Place. You know how dear this topic is to me so I am thrilled. The group asked me to introduce the group, the topic which I loved and then they presented programs, tactics. They deserved this award…I also received a special award and cup called, “Personality Plus…I had a fantastic day!”

She added: It is exciting to see how its Executive Director Thomas Kamber uses the Senior Planet not only as a lab teaching technology to seniors but extending it to a venue to explore social issues.”

Thomas responds to Muriel: “Thanks, Muriel for the great report, and for providing so much energy and guidance throughout the day. It really was wonderful to see so many diverse people coming together to work on issues like housing, transportation, ageism, and home care.

What Muriel didn't say is that she gave a rousing call to action around the value of engaging older adults as agents of change--inspiring people to see how we can solve ageism while we solve problems, but that it has to be collaboratively with older adults driving the agenda. People clapped and cheered while she was talking and it was a great moment during the hackathon.”

The “Hack Aging” event was featured in Richard Eisenberg’s article in Forbes, “How to Improve Aging? Hack It.” (https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2017/06/29/how-to-improve-aging-hack-it/#5af569a61acb)

Photo:  Muriel Beach with the two trophies

 

At its biennial Board meeting held on July 28, 2017 in San Francisco, Dr. Rosy Pereira, Chair of the Nomination/Election Committee, announced the result of the 2017 election: Alex Kalache and MaryAnn Tsao were re-elected and elected, respectively, as Co-Presidents for a three-year term starting at the close of the 2017 Board meeting.

Dr. Kalache, President of ILC Brazil, is a specialist in age-related issues. Specifically, his expertise is in the epidemiology of ageing & the life-course, inter-sectoral policy development (including age-friendly initiatives), health promotion, old-age care, human rights and migration within the context of ageing as well as the more general cultural complexities of the world-wide longevity revolution.

Dr. Kalache has been a leading pioneer in ageing issues for close to forty years in various roles: as academic, international civil servant and advocate. His was one of the very earliest voices to articulate the global nature of population ageing, together with the potentialities and the risks through inaction inherent within it. His contributions toward the shifting of the traditional paradigms in the field of ageing are widely acknowledged on the global stage.

In 2008 he relocated to the USA where he assumed a new position as Senior Policy Adviser on Global Ageing to the President at the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM). He simultaneously commenced the role of Global Ambassador for the London based HelpAge International the largest and most influential worldwide civil society organization on ageing.

Dr. Kalache has a long history of advocacy on the human rights of older persons. He is actively involved in the process toward the adoption of a United Nation’s Convention for the Rights of Older Persons. He has served as a Special Adviser to the Brazilian Secretary of Human Rights, Brazilian Mission to the UN in New York in addition to the International Alliance of NGOs for the Rights of Older Persons. For full description of Dr Kalache’s experience, honors, and awards, please visit http://ilcbrazil.org/president/

Dr. Mary Ann Tsao is President of ILC Singapore and Chairwoman and Founding Director of Tsao Foundation. The Foundation was established in 1993 by her then 86 year old Grandmother to serve the well-being of older people in an inclusive society through innovations in community based health and social service models, training and education, as well as research and advocacy. The Foundation was recently appointed as Asian Development Bank’s first Center of Excellence.” Mary Ann was awarded the Public Service Medal in 2000 and Public Service Star in 2004 for her work on ageing, and Public Service Star (Bar) – BBM(L) – in 2015.

Dr. Tsao serves on numerous boards and committees of governmental and non-profit organizations as well as academic institutions in Singapore, and is a frequent invited speaker at local and international conferences on ageing, philanthropy and family business. She is also a Director for FBN (Family Business Network) Asia, a non-profit association of family businesses committed to business practices that serve as a model of sustainability.

Mary Ann has also served as a technical advisor for numerous multilateral agencies, such as WHO Geneva office’s Ageing and Life Course unit, UNESCAP (UN Economic and Social Commission for the Asia Pacific), ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) Secretariat, as well as served on the board of various international agencies on ageing, including London-based HelpAge International, for which she was the Chairwoman from 2002-2004 and is currently one of its ambassadors.

Dr. Tsao is a US trained pediatrician with a public health background, specializing in community and primary care planning, and social medicine. She has extensive experience working with disadvantaged communities in the US and Singapore.

For further information, please visit  http://www.ilc-alliance.org/index.php/members/details/ilc-singapore and  https://fbnasia.org/en/mary-ann-tsao/

Photo: From left: Dr. Alex Kalache, Baroness Sally Greengross (former Co-President) and Dr. Mary Ann Tsao.

At its biennial meeting held on July 28, 2017 in San Francisco, the ILC Global Alliance board appointed Baroness Sally Greengross its first Special Ambassador

In this role Sally will speak at events, raise ILC Global Alliance’s visibility and undertake various other tasks to help it attain global objectives, capitalizing on her international recognition as an expert on aging. Alex Kalache, Co-President of the ILC Global Alliance commented ‘In addition to her commitment to its development over the many previous year as co-founder of the ILC-Global Alliance, Sally’s vision, charisma, integrity, and brilliance combined with the highest level of professional respect she globally commands have all been instrumental to ensure that ILC Global Alliance has continued to thrive following Bob Butler’s departure. We are delighted that Sally will utilize these attributes as Special Ambassador.’ Sally stepped down from the Co-Presidency at the Board meeting in July 2017 after having successfully served the statutory two-terms.

Baroness Sally Greengross has been a crossbench (independent) member of the House of Lords since 2000 and Co-Chairs four All-Party Parliamentary Groups: Dementia, Corporate Social Responsibility, Continence Care and Ageing and Older People. She is the Vice Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life, and is Treasurer of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Equalities. Sally is also Chair of the cross-party Intergenerational Fairness Forum.

Sally is Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre – UK; was Co-President of the ILC Global Alliance from 2010-17 and is now their Special Ambassador; and was a Commissioner for the Equality and Human Rights Commission from 2006-12.

Baroness Greengross was Director General of Age Concern England from 1987 until 2000. Until 2000, she was joint Chair of the Age Concern Institute of Gerontology at Kings College London, and Secretary General of Eurolink Age. She is an Ambassador for Alzheimer’s Society, SilverLine and HelpAge International.

Baroness Greengross is a Member of several advisory boards including Home Instead’s Global Strategy Council; Fujitsu’s Responsible Business Board; and BlackRock Retirement Institute’s Advisory Council.

She is President of the Pensions Policy Institute and the Association of Retirement Housing Managers; Honorary Vice President of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, a Vice President of the Local Government Association and Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Institute & Faculty of Actuaries.

Sally is Patron of several organisations including the Association of Retirement Community Operators; Care & Repair England; the National Network of Clinical Ethics Committees; the Ransackers Association; the Association for Ageing & Education; and Age UK Westminster. Sally holds honorary doctorates from nine UK universities.

Her work on ageing has been recognised by the UN Committee on Ageing and she received an outstanding achievement award from the British Society of Gerontology as well a British Geriatric Society Medal. Sally was UK Woman of Europe in 1990 and has been an Ambassador for the Prince of Wales supporting responsible business practice.

ILC-Brazil President, Alexandre Kalache, delivered the opening keynote address for the Asian Development Bank’s Regional Conference on Ageing and Long-Term Care Systems. The Conference took place on 28-29 June at the ADB Headquarters in Manila.

On 28 June, Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil delivered the keynote address for the Asian Development Bank's Regional Conference on Aging and Long-Term Care Systems at the ADB Headquarters in Manila, Philippines. The conference brought together representatives from ADB developing member countries, academia, partners in government, and other development agencies to share ideas, experiences, and good practices on ageing and long-term care in Asia and the Pacific, particularly on areas of policy, finance, innovation, healthcare, social protection, urban development and education.

The opening keynote set the town for subsequent discussions: it introduced the concept of active ageing as a lifelong process during which we need to accumulate four capitals. Dr. Kalache also highlighted how important it is to understand that health is created in everyday life and that the earlier we prepare ourselves for long lives the better, but it is never too late. Creating age-friendly communities is one way of providing enabling environments for active ageing and this, according to Dr. Kalache “involves listening to people’s voices and building appropriate services”.

 

Picture: Asian Development Bank's Regional Conference

Written by Ina Voelcker, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

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Aging 2.0 brought together a number of start-ups, investors and experts on ageing at its Americas Summit in Toronto.

On June 21st, ILC-Brazil technical director, Ina Voelcker and ILC-Canada research director Louise Plouffe participated in the Americas Summit of Aging2.0 in Toronto. The Summit brought together a group of ageing experts, start-ups and investors and was organized by Aging 2.0, its Toronto Chapter, led by Azi Boloorchi of Revera and took place in the offices of Goodmans, a law firm who launched SenbridGe, a division focusing on healthcare and ageing.

One of the two panels was about livable communities and brought a more holistic vision, beyond the dominating focus on residential care and assisted living, to the discussions. Ina Voelcker questionned to which extent these innovations will be accessible to more disadvantaged groups of society and recommended that investments have to go beyond living arrangements for older people. There should also be a focus, for example, on ways to challenge existing behaviours and attitudes in order to make communities more age-friendly. Stephen Johnston, the founder and CEO of Aging 2.0, thanked the participants of the panel for reminding the audience that “aging is about more than assisted living”.

The start-ups who presented to this panel are: BeFine (São Paulo), Steadiwear Inc. (Canada), K4Connect(USA) and CarePredict, Inc. (USA). See a summary of each start-up below.

The second panel of the day was about cognitive health and counted on the participation of Bill Jarvis, Resident Innovation Ambassador of Revera who shared his vision as a potential user of these innovative solutions. Towards the end of the Summit, Adam Blinik, Director of Public Policy and Communication of Uber spoke about the future of urban mobility and the potential of Uber to contribute to better quality of life among older people.

Posted by: Ina Voelcker, Technical Director of ILC-Brazil, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

Picture: Ina Voelcker (right) and Stephen Johnston, founder and CEO of Aging 2.0 (left)

Foundation Oportunidad Mayor launches Valdivia as a Chilean centre for gerontology. Dr. Alex Kalache delivered the keynote of the event.

During the last week of May, the Chilean Foundation Oportunidad Mayor organized a seminar to launch the city of Valdivia as a “polo gerontológico” for the whole country. The idea is to equip Valdivia with the tools to transform itself into a model city where older people can age actively and to construct a national initiative of integrated care of the older person.

The seminar, attended by over 400 professionals, counted on the participation of Rosita Kornfeld, Independent Expert on the Rights of Older Persons to the United Nations and Alexandre Kalache, ILC-Brazil President, who spoke about active ageing from a life-course perspective, also introducing the concept of gerontolescence and promoting the idea of “the earlier the better, but it is never too late”.

One of the concrete initiatives to turn Valdivia into a gerontology centre for the whole country is to follow the principles of the WHO Age-friendly Cities network and turn Valdivia into an age-friendly city.

Posted by: Ina Voelcker, Technical Director of ILC-Brazil, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

ILC-Brazil participates in World Bank Workshop on “Population Aging and the organization of health and social care in Brazil”

The World Bank (WB) is preparing a new wide-ranging study on population ageing and the organization of health and social care in Brazil. It is intended to serve as “an instrument of policy dialogue with a future Brazilian government about the challenges and options to improve efficiency and equity in healthcare and social care while responding to population aging within a tight fiscal context”. Technical Director of ILC-Brazil Ina Voelcker and ILC-Brazil President, Alexandre Kalache are contributing authors to this study. In May, they were part of a three-day World Bank workshop in Rio de Janeiro where the main authors presented their first drafts. The eminent group of participating national and international academics and WB Directors were joined by representatives from the Brazilian Federal Ministries of Health and Social Development, as well as the WHO and UNFPA.

Posted by: Ina Voelcker, Technical Director of ILC-Brazil, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

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ILC-Brazil President gives keynote at the Fernando Henrique Cardoso Foundation together with Dutch Vice-Minister of Health

Alexandre Kalache was again guest speaker at the Fernando Henrique Cardoso Foundation (Fundação FHC) in São Paulo in May. He spoke alongside the Dutch Vice-Minister of Health, Bas van den Dungen, on the subject of what lessons Brazil can derive from Dutch public policies and actions on ageing. Minister van den Dungen has served as the Dutch Vice-Minister of Health since 2014. ILC-Brazil has a close working relationship with the Dutch Consulates in both Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. The Fundação FHC is a think tank that was established in 2004 by the former President of Brazil, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, with a mandate to produce and to disseminate knowledge about the challenges of development and democracy in Brazil. Dr Kalache’s presentation can be viewed on the Facebook page of the Fundação FHC.

Posted by: Ina Voelcker, Technical Director of ILC-Brazil, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

Picture: Alexandre Kalache (left)

ILC-Brazil President gives keynote presentation to the Federation of Industries of the State of Santa Catarina (FIESC)

On May 17th, Alexandre Kalache addressed a large audience of the Federation of Industries of Santa Catarina (FIESC) in the State Capital Florianopolis in May on the subject of “The Longevity Revolution in the context of the 4th Industrial Revolution”. Founded in 1950, FIESC is a coalition of the State syndicates of industry: SESI, CIESC, SENAI & IEL. It works to promote the industry of the State and to assist the formulation of public policies and projects in Santa Catarina. SESI, the social services component, focuses on quality of life; the promotion of health and well-being; security/health in the workplace; education; and innovation in health technology.

Posted by: Ina Voelcker, Technical Director of ILC-Brazil, ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

No image available.

On April 19th, 2017, ILC Israel and The Center for Multidisciplinary Research in Aging of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev held its semi-annual conference. This year’s conference topic was “Innovations and challenges in gerontology and geriatrics: The effects of the Holocaust on the health and well-being of survivors and their offspring (children, second, and third generation).”

This multidisciplinary conference was a great success with an estimated 200 attendees present. Topics of discussion shared two main focuses – “Late effects of the Holocaust in the mirror of research,” and “Late effects of the Holocaust in the treatment field.”

Presenters and attendees came from all over Israel, and included faculty and students from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Bar-Ilan University, and the University of Haifa, as well as members of the Israel Ministry of Health, and members of 'Amcha' - a non-profit organization with the goal of providing psychological and social services to Holocaust survivors and their families.

Greetings:

Prof. Sara Carmel – Head of Center for Research in Aging and ILC-Israel

Prof. Tzvi Hacohen - Rector of Ben-Gurion University (BGU)

Prof. Yaakov Henkin Vice- Dean for medical Education (BGU)

Mrs. Rotem Shitrit – Head of 'Amcha' Center in the South of Israel

Presentations:

  • Professor Amit Shrira - Psychologist: Does the trauma of the Holocaust effect the aging of the second generation?
  • Professor Norm O’Rourke - Psychologist: Autobiographical memory and recall of traumatic early life experiences
  • Professor Lital Keinan-Boker – Medical physician and epidemiologist: Long-term physical illness in Israeli Holocaust survivors
  • Dr. Doron Sagi - Gerontologist: A psycho-social model for the evaluation and comprehensive treatment of Holocaust survivors in the Amcha Center, Beer-Sheva
  • Dr. Martin Auerbach - Psychiatrist: Coping with existential questions in psychotherapy in treating very old Holocaust survivors
  • Ms. Sivan Ben Ari - Social worker: Feelings of life and death in the therapeutic encounters with a Holocaust survivor

For information about the abovementioned studies/presentations or about the conference, please email the Center for Multidisciplinary Research in Aging, at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel: cmra@bgu.ac.il

Picture: A moment of ILC Israel conference.

Posted by ILC Israel

Faculty member Esteban Calvo has two new publications. The first is “Retirement Sequences of Older Americans: Moderately Destandardized and Highly Stratified Across Gender, Class, and Race” in The Gerontologist  and "Rural pension reform in China: A critical analysis" also co-authored by Esteban Calvo appears in the Journal of Aging Studies.

The first article  was co-authored with Ignacio Madero-Cabib and our director Ursula Staudinger. Here sequence analysis was used to model labor-force patterns among older Americans. The authors were surprised to uncover patterns that seemed more standardized, irreversible, and age graded than previously reported. They argue that previous literature may have overstated the destandardization of labor-force patterns revolving around retirement because the pattern gets lost when modeling a continuous process as individual transitions. These patterns got further complicated by gender, class, and race differences.

The second publication "Rural pension reform in China: A critical analysis" also co-authored by Esteban Calvo appears in the Journal of Aging Studies. The researchers analyzed rural pension reform in China, which has done an impressive job in rapidly enrolling most of its rural population in a voluntary pension system. Working age adults signed up in part due to a clever family-binding policy. However, China's rural pension scheme needs more adequate social pension benefits, something that seems affordable when comparisons are made with other developing countries with social pensions, such as those in Latin America and Caribbean.

To request reprints of either of these articles, please contact the Columbia Aging Center: ColumbiaAgingCenter@cumc.columbia.edu.

Posted by ILC-USA

“Don’t Lose Your Brain at Work – The Role of Recurrent Novelty at Work in Cognitive and Brain Aging,” relates new findings about how work can affect brain aging.  (February 6, 2017 issue of Frontiers in Psychology)

Co-authors include Jan Oltmanns as well as Columbia Aging Center director Ursula Staudinger.

Cognitive and brain aging is strongly influenced by everyday settings such as work demands. Long-term exposure to low job complexity, for instance, has detrimental effects on cognitive functioning and regional gray matter (GM) volume. Brain and cognition, however, are also characterized by plasticity. We postulate that the experience of novelty (at work) is one important trigger of plasticity. We investigated the cumulative effect of recurrent exposure to work-task changes (WTC) at low levels of job complexity on GM volume and cognitive functioning of middle-aged production workers across a time window of 17 years. In a case-control study, we found that amount of WTC was associated with better processing speed and working memory as well as with more GM volume in brain regions that have been associated with learning and that show pronounced age-related decline. Recurrent novelty at work may serve as an ‘in vivo’ intervention that helps counteracting debilitating long-term effects of low job complexity.

For the full publication, see: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00117/full

Posted by ILC-USA

Senior citizens participated in a flash mob that spread the message on the need for saving and conserving water as part of ILC-I’s Environment protection initiatives.

ILC-I looks upon senior citizens as catalysts of change, especially with regard to Environment Protection initiatives and to spread the message of saving and conserving water on the occasion of the World Environment Day of the 5th of June, a flash mob of senior citizens was organised at the Pune Central Mall, Koregaon Park, Pune, on the 4th of June 2017.

Forty seniors participated in this flash mob which was the first of its kind in Pune by senior citizens. They danced to the songs that espoused the cause of water conservation, gently waving placards that also displayed ‘Save Water’ messages.

The energy and enthusiasm of the seniors was heightened as ILC-I had arranged for the seniors to enjoy some quality family time with their children and grandchildren at the Pune Central Mall, opening up an opportunity of celebrating intergenerational solidarity. Transport arrangements had been made to bring along two hundred and fifty senior citizens with their families to the Mall, where, besides the flash mob, fun-filled activities like games, songs and dance were also organised which enthralled all the members, young and old, while they also enjoyed the refreshments served to them.

The flash mob video clip has been uploaded onto You Tube for everyone to view - click here to see the video.

Picture: Senior citizens in the Pune flash mob.

Written by Anjali Raje, Executive Director, ILC-I

Population ageing together with globalization and urbanization characterize the major demographic upheavals of our time. A new narrative is beginning to emerge globally where older persons are viewed legitimate participants and contributors to society.

Using the narrative as a backdrop, the speakers will address the social and economic opportunities with longevity; ageism as a  fundamental barrier to healthy ageing; environments such as age-friendly created to enable older people to do what they value; and the complementary roles of the United Nations and member countries and NGOs to assure “no one is left behind as the UN looks to 2030 and beyond.”

Speakers include: Greg Shaw (IFA), Ursula M. Staudinger, Ph.D. (Columbia Aging Center/ILC USA), Janet A. Sigal, Ph.D. (MGO Committee on Aging/NY), Ruth Finkelstein, Sc.D. (Columbia Aging Center/ILC USA), Rosemary Lane, M.A. (UN DESA and UN Focal Point on Ageing). The session will be moderated by Cynthia Stuen, Ph.D. (IFA).

The session will be webcast. For information, please visit: http://webtv.un.org

For further information, visit:

http://aging.columbia.edu/about-columbia-aging-center/news-and-events/june-1-global-ageing-population-impact-and

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India is facing an acute water crisis for some years now and it is imperative that conserving water becomes a priority for the nation. ILC-I explores how senior citizens can take the lead to address this issue.

A lecture to create awareness on “Water Conservation- The Role of Senior Citizens” was organized by the International Longevity Centre-India (ILC-I) on the 22nd of March 2017 with the support of Gharda Chemicals Ltd at the Lenyadri Society Hall, Pashan- Sus Road, Pashan, on the occasion of the World Water Day marked by the United Nations.

The lecture was delivered by the Water Conservation Expert, Col. Shashikant Dalvi, District Manager (Pune), The Climate Reality Project, India, to bring to the attention of society the need for and importance of saving and conserving water, given the global changes that are taking place resulting in acute water scarcity and shortage all over our country.

The World Water Day as advocated by UN was the apt day for focusing on not just what needs to be done, but also on what can be done by members of society and more so by the senior citizens of our country.

Prior to the lecture, a “Walk for Water” was also held wherein around 150 senior citizens along with some young volunteers walked a stretch of two kilometers along the Pashan-Sus Road, shouting slogans of “Save Water, Save Life”, and the like, urging citizens to not waste water and work towards conserving and saving it. Many of the residents of the more than 30 housing societies along the road as also curious onlookers stopped by to watch and absorb the message that the senior citizens were so committedly pleading for in the hot sun on an early March morning.

The senior citizens had been given bags containing a water-bottle, a cap, a tetra pack fruit drink and a packet of biscuits to keep them going and stay energized as they walked the walk.

The ILC-I staff had also prepared special placards on the occasion of the World Water Day advocating messages on a Green environment, on how to save water and why, and these placards were enthusiastically held aloft by the senior citizens along with banners.

Col. Dalvi, while addressing the senior citizens after the Walk for Water, spoke of how there are simple ways in which water could be saved or conserved and how the senior citizens themselves could spread this message of water conservation through Valueducation programmes where children are educated on such social causes by senior citizens.

 He further added that Senior citizens could also undertake Rainwater harvesting promotion projects by orienting builders, housing societies to the concept of saving or conserving rainwater that goes waste,  down terraces and rooftops of our houses and buildings and to install rainwater harvesting systems on their rooftops to conserve water which could then be used when there was less rainfall- which has in fact, become a perennial problem in India for quite some years now.

The seniors were very enthused to participate in this ‘Walk for Water’ and also happy to receive a lot of information on what they could do to help India conserve water.

Written by Anjali Raje, Executive Director, ILC-I

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David Sinclair and Dean Hochlaf from ILC-UK visited Washington D.C. to present findings from a major new report on the international retirement challenge.

In March David Sinclair (Director, ILC-UK) and Dean Hochlaf (Assistant Economist, ILC-UK) presented the findings from a new research project on the retirement income challenge across the OECD. The American Council of Life Insurers (ACLI) graciously hosted the event organised and sponsored by Jackson National Life Insurance Company and its parent company Prudential plc, in their stunning offices overlooking Capitol Hill. Attendees included Governor Dirk Kempthorne, former Secretary of the Interior and president and CEO of the ACLI and Dr. Mark Calabria, Chief Economist to Vice-President Pence. Many other distinguished guests from academia, industry and government were present. The presentation was followed by an enthusiastic discussion regarding how income for the retired can be bolstered and the economic challenges which lie ahead.

Following this David and Dean met with Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President for Thought Leadership at AARP a major interest group in the US, acting to enhance the quality of life for all as they age. Potential collaborations between ILC-UK and the international alliance were discussed. Jonathon provided a brief but informative tour of the cutting-edge technologies that AARP fund and help develop to improve the lives of older people. The trip was enjoyable for both David and Dean and exemplifies the growing influence that ILC-UK has thanks to the hard-work and dedication of the team.

Picture: David Sinclair (right) and Dean Hochlaf (left).

Written by Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist, ILC-UK

The 5th International Longevity Forum will focus on resilience in a long-lived world that is increasingly being defined by an exciting but bewildering fusion of new technologies across the digital, physical and biological domains accompanied by widespread cultural and economic dislocation.

National and international speakers will present their research, experience and reflections. Attention will be given to strategies that strengthen physical, social and mental well-being throughout the life course. The 5th International Forum will take place in Rio de Janeiro on October 19th and 20th 2017. It is organized by ILC-Brazil, with support by Bradesco Seguros.

The theme of ILC-Brazil’s 5th International Longevity Forum will be resilience and will take place on October 19th and 20th, 2017. The main sponsor is one of Brazil’s biggest insurance providers, Bradesco Seguros.

Any sudden, highly impactful event that forces inexorable change upon society is a revolution. We are being impacted by two unprecedented and concurrent revolutions today – the Longevity Revolution and the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Longevity Revolution

The world’s population is rapidly ageing. From 2000 to 2050, the number of people aged 60 years and older is expected to triple, from 600 million to 2 billion. By 2050, it is predicted that about 22% of the world’s population will be aged 60 years or older. This is the “Longevity Revolution (The Longevity Revolution; creating a society for all ages, Alexandre Kalache 2013).

Fourth Industrial Revolution

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is “the inexorable shift from the simple digitalization that characterized the Third Industrial Revolution to a much more complex form of innovation based on the combination of multiple technologies in novel ways” (Klaus Schwab, Founder/Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum)

Longer lives will increasingly be experienced in the context of the rapid emergence of more and more new, highly interactive technologies. The ability to respond to both these revolutions is a privilege given to current generations. A large part of that response will require the construction of a much more resilient society. All individuals, in order to age well, must develop the necessary reserves to adapt, to identify/access support and to grow from the challenges encountered throughout life.

The 5th International Longevity Forum will focus on resilience in a long-lived world that is increasingly being defined by an exciting but bewildering fusion of new technologies across the digital, physical and biological domains accompanied by widespread cultural and economic dislocation. National and international speakers will present their research, experience and reflections. Attention will be given to strategies that strengthen physical, social and mental well-being throughout the life course.

Written by Ina Voelcker, Technical director of International Longevity Centre Brazil

On March 18th, Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil participated as inspirational speaker in Shell’s LiveWIRE weekend for young entrepreneurs. At the event, he highlighted the importance of the longevity revolution and the impact population ageing will have on their business ideas as well as their lives.

“You have heard a lot about population growth and just now that by 2050, there will be 10 billion people on this planet. But have you thought about how many of them will be older people and who will be those older people?” This is how Alexandre Kalache opened his inspirational talk at the Shell LiveWIRE weekend on March, 18th in the newly revitalised harbour area of Rio de Janeiro.

The young entrepreneurs aged between 20 and 34 were given food for thought, recognizing that it is they themselves who will be part of the large proportion of older persons by 2050. The Shell LiveWIRE programme, established in the UK in 1982 and in Brazil in 2002, offers free online business advice and funding to young entrepreneurs.

Picture: Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil during his talk to the entrepreneurs.

Written by Ina Voelcker, International Longevity Centre Brazil

On March 15th, Alexandre Kalache delivered the keynote of the event “Longevity – impact on the private sector” organized by the American Chamber of Commerce for Brazil (Amcham-Brasil).

After his keynote, he moderated an expert panel “Senior professionals: advantages and challenges for businesses” with participation of representatives from the Institute Mongeral Aegon, Dotz and Sodezo Benefícios e Incentivos.

How population ageing impacts the private sector was the central question of a seminar organized by the American Chamber of Commerce for Brazil in São Paulo. Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil, was invited to deliver the keynote of the event.

After asking “who is it who has Money to go on cruises and to keep the hotel sector busy?”, Dr. Kalache suggested that, “by creating specific businesses, it is possible to keep hotels busy outside of the main season. In the real-estate sector, it is possible to offer products for seniors, who have resources and are not interested in apartments with three bedrooms…”.

His speech was followed by a panel discussion on “Senior professionals: advantages and challenges for businesses” in which representatives from the private sector participated.

Picture: Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil with Rogério Bragherolli, Executive Director RH, Sodexo Benefícios e Incentivos, Henrique Noya, Executive Director, Instituto Mongeral Aegon and Fábio Sant’Anna, Director, Dotz.

Written by Ina Voelcker, International Longevity Centre Brazil

In the context of the third review cycle of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (MIPAA), ILC-Brazil contributed, together with InterAge Consultancy in Gerontology, to a global project on the “Voices of Older People”, led by HelpAge International and UNFPA.

As a contribution to the global review, group discussions with older people from four municipalities of differing levels of human development in Brazil were held during the month of February. Aim was to get a general overview of how well older Brazilians feel their rights are protected and how government policies have an impact on their daily lives.

The Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (MIPAA) is now being reviewed for a third time. The guidelines for the review and appraisal process, provided by the United Nations, foresee a bottom-up approach with substantial and very active participation of older persons.

In this context, HelpAge International and UNFPA are leading a global bottom-up review, entitled “Voices of Older Persons”. In 2012, this review was published as part of HelpAge’s flagship report “Ageing in the 21st Century: a celebration and a challenge”. For the third review, ILC-Brazil prepared, together with InterAge Consultancy in Gerontology, the Brazilian contribution.

Given that Brazil is a very large and heterogeneous country, it was impossible to gather a complete picture of older Brazilians’ perceptions of how their rights are being protected. Nonetheless, the results of four group discussions in four different municipalities of different levels of human development provide an overview of the problems encountered by older Brazilians in day-to-day life and their impression of progress, or the lack of it, in terms of public services.

Written by Ina Voelcker, International Longevity Centre Brazil

We are delighted to announce that ILC-UK Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross OBE has been awarded a special Lifetime Achievement award by the British Geriatric Society (BGS), on the occasion of their 70th anniversary celebrations.

At a ceremony attended by patients, members of the BGS, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers, HRH The Prince of Wales presented Baroness Greengross with the award for her contribution to improving services for older people, and her ongoing support for the BGS.

Baroness Greengross sits as a Crossbench Peer in the House of Lords, and serves as Vice-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia, and Co-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Ageing and Older People.

Picture: HRH The Prince of Wales and Baroness Sally Greengross.

Written by ILC-UK staff.

Three University of Tokyo undergraduates, who were in New York in mid-February to participate in the UN Commission on Social Development 55th session, called on Ms. Muriel Beach, ILC Global Alliance’s representative to the UN, to exchange views and perspectives on global aging and intergenerational relations. Their student volunteer program at the UN was recommended by the ILC Japan and coordinated by the ILC GA’s New York team.

Muriel, a past president of New York Statewide Senior Action Council NYC Chapter and an active member of NGO Committee on Aging Subcommittee on intergenerational relations, discussed various facets of her long career as an activist on the local, state and international levels.

The students, Seira Ikarashi, Sawako Hirata, and Minami Yusa, were intrigued, and asked many questions, some of them pointed: Do you think your voice is heard at the UN?; What can you do to influence the UN decision making on aging?; I hear much about the deplorable condition at many nursing homes, what do you think should be done? A student also commented, “I became very interested in what Muriel said about the rights of elderly, and her message about the mindset that you just have to keep working hard to achieve what is need to be done.”

Ms. Beach, who recently suffered from a street accident, commented about her dialogue with the students, emphasizing the importance of intergenerational solidarity:

“I cannot walk, cannot see well but sure can talk and apparently make sense according to the students. I love Intergenerational exchanges and do think this was an excellent one. I tried to inspire them to work intergenerationally when they returned to Japan. Their questions were thoughtful and they were very attentive. Their comments in saying goodbye revealed they benefited from their visit and I felt they were being truly honest not just polite. It was a great morale booster during this difficult prolonged period of recovery. “

Muriel continued:

“The future rests with the young and intergeneration work is so important. We must help them overcome ageism concepts they might have and make them want to spend time with their elders. All elders have lived interesting lives - talk about that to the younger generation not present a series of statements of Aging aching body issues. We have knowledge to pass on but must do it in a way to entice the young to want to be around us. I stressed today we need each other. I sincerely hope that other centers of the ILC group will also promote intergenerational projects.”

Written by Masako Osako, International Longevity Center Global Alliance Secretariat

 

 

India is fast moving towards a cashless and digital economy. The use of the mobile phone/cell is increasing rapidly and with a view to making its usage, elder-friendly, this training programme was organised.

The Indian Prime Minister, Mr. Narendra Modi, has opened up an economy that would be cashless and digital. For this, he has advocated the use of the mobile phone as a ‘personal banker.’

The President of ILC-I, Dr. R. A. Mashelkar, himself a scientist and technocrat of international repute, and Mr. Jayant Umranikar, Chairman, ILC-I, who also believes in dynamic innovation, believe that ILC- I should help seniors gear up towards such an economy and make the mobile/cell, a ‘friend’ of the elders.

ILC-I, arranged four such half-day training programmes with the support of Gharda Chemicals on the 16th of January, 20th of January, 8th of February and 15th of February 2017.

A professional software and technical expert was engaged to train the seniors in batches of 15 to 17 elders. Some of the young  ILC-I team staff members, all of whom were adept in mobiles and the related technology, also pitched in to assist and aid the senior citizens.

The training programmes were completely a hands-on experience for the seniors who were given basic information of the uses of a mobile, the various apps, how to download them, how to create a g-mail address, using of the various apps, especially for making online payments of utility bills like the electricity and telephone charges, using Facebook, What’s App, Skype and You Tube, amongst many other features that a mobile phone has to offer.

The phobia that quite a few elderly had towards the mobile phone was completely wiped off by the end of the training and the senior citizens were quite happy to use their mobiles for services other than just making and receiving phone calls.

ILC-I also distributed complimentary copies of a book on ‘Smart Phones’ written by the technical expert for them to refer to whenever in doubt.

It was a thoroughly enjoyable learning experience for the senior citizens, and their child-like enthusiasm and energy as they learnt how to use the mobile with all its different features was truly exciting.

Anjali Raje, Executive Director ILC-I

ILC-I applauds those who bring quality of life to the elderly, with its annual ILC-I Awards which recognize qualitative work done in the field of ageing by/for elders.

The annual ILC-I awards are a salute to the dynamism and enterprising spirit of organizations, individuals and other stakeholders advocating the noble cause of senior citizens.

ILC-I is committed to recognizing all those who work for the cause of senior citizens for which the ILC-I Awards have been instituted since 2010.

There are three sets of ILC-I Awards

- The first set of Awards are the late B. G. Deshmukh Award: in this there are two categories- an Award for a senior citizens’ organisation for “Promoting Qualitative Excellence in Ageing” for excellent work done by it for the well-being and development of senior citizens in particular and of society in general. Two senior citizens’ organisations were chosen for these Awards for the year 2016.

- The second category under the late B. G. Deshmukh Awards is the Lifetime Achievement Award given to a senior citizen over the age of 70 years for commendable work done by him/her in the field of arts including music and dance, culture, sports, literature, education, science and technology, medicine, social work etc. Two senior citizens over the age of 70 years were given this Award and a special ILC-I Commendation Award was also given this year.

- The second ILC-I Award is the late Dr. S. D. Gokhale Award given to a journalist for “Promoting Qualitative Journalism in Ageing’. This year the Award was given to Ms. Arati Rajan Menon, Editor, Harmony magazine, for her regular writings in the print media on the various issues and concerns of the senior citizens with a view to empowering the elderly to lead Participatory, Productive, Qualitative and Healthy Lives with Dignity.

Each of the above Awards carries a cash prize, a citation and a memento. The Awards were given away by the renowned industrialist and philanthropist, Ms. Lila Poonawala on the 30th of November 2016 at the Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Pune.

- The third ILC-I Award is the late Anjani Mashelkar Inclusive Innovation Award given under the aegis of the ILC-I Awards, and is meant for scientists/technologists who develop cost-effective products/services for the poor old. It is instituted by the President of ILC-I, Dr. R. A. Mashelkar, in memory of his late mother, Anjani Mashelkar. For the year 2016, this Award which carries a prize money of Rs. 1 lakh, a citation and  a memento was given to Mr. Mihir Shah of UE Life Sciences for the innovative gadget,  the ‘I-breast exam’.

This Award was given by Dr. Vikas Amte, the reputed social activist and doctor who caters exclusively to the leprosy-affected people on the 17th of November 2016.

Written by Anjali Raje, Executive Director, ILC-I

Elders trained to undertake practical designing and implementation for advocating and supporting the “Green Cause.” Documenting the work done and being felicitated for stellar work done was part of the feedback workshop.

This two days’ workshop was organized by ILC-I with the support of Gharda Chemicals on the 20th and 21st of October 2016 at YASHADA, Pune.

The invited participants were two office-bearers from each of the fifteen senior citizens’ organisations from different parts of the state of Maharashtra which had been awarded the ILC-I Awards since 2010.

The rationale for inviting the representatives of these organisations was that these organisations had a track record of doing commendable work for elders in particular and the society in general (and which had been recognized by ILC-I by felicitating them with the ILC-I Awards).The concept behind this workshop was to make a qualitative difference in our lives- and to engage senior citizens as the catalysts, to do so.

Our Environment today is very fragile- it needs proper nurturing and dedicated tending to- or else soon mankind would be faced with all kinds of environmental disasters that would make life on earth inhabitable for it.

Experts from the fields of rain-water harvesting, recycling, solid waste management, segregation of dry and wet garbage,  Community Cleanliness, Valueducation (wherein elders go to schools and orient children to the “Green Cause’, Vermicomposting and other such environment related subjects were invited to speak and give training to the participants.

The objective of the workshop was essentially to harness the wisdom, knowledge, energy and time of the senior citizens for working towards maintaining a green and sustainable environment, for which they are given training and information by the invited experts.

The trained senior citizens were to go back to their hometowns and with the help, support and cooperation of their Senior Citizens’ Organisation undertake one environment-protection initiative and implement it.

They were then asked to document the activity and send ILC-I a documented record by the 20th of January 2017, along with photographs, CDs/DVDs etc.

The representatives were once again invited to attend a one day feedback workshop on the 31st of January 2017 and report or present the work done by their organisations at this workshop. The best three projects were given shields and commendation certificates.

This initiative instilled a sense of qualitative participation, a feeling of dignity and productivity amongst the elders as they undertook an environment-protection and sustainable programme for the well-being of society and mankind. This was a singularly innovative example of the hidden potential that the elders have and what they can do when the right opportunity comes their way.

It is a pioneering endeavor undertaken by ILC-I and which was received with whole-hearted enthusiasm and sincerity by the invited elderly participants.

Written by Anjali Raje, Executive Director, ILC-I

ILC-Brazil hosted its 4th International Longevity Forum in October 2016.

This most recent event in an annual series brought together a deliberately diverse range of international and national professionals in the design, philosophy, architecture, social work and healthcare fields among others, to discuss a conceptual framework for age-friendly design in the context of the most recent technological advances.

Among the more than thirty presenters and panelists was ILC-UK Director, David Sinclair. Based on the discussions of the Forum, ILC-Brazil, in conjunction with a smaller team of designers, has produced the white paper "Toward Age-friendly Design" which is intended to be the first stage in an on-going conversation to give greater definition to age-friendly design in the 21st century.

The "Toward Age-friendly Design" white paper is informed by two key components - the active protagonism of older adults and the adoption of a comprehensive life-course perspective. The aim is to prompt younger professionals in the design and technology arenas to reflect on their own ageing and to find inspiration in the opportunities presented by age-friendly and age-neutral design – i.e. design that is friendly to all ages.

Additionally, it is hoped that this document will give license to older adults to reassess their relationship to both design and technology and to assert their role in the design process. The contention is that the new technology-enabled platforms provide enormous potential for decision-making at all stages of the design continuum.

The driving principle is that services, products, information, communications and their applications must be developed on the needs, the demands and the partnerships of all ultimate users, including older adults. The intention is that "Toward Age-friendly Design" will be a starting point for an on-going global conversation. An ILC-Brazil convened task force of leading international designers, technologists, gerontologists and other professionals will also take the discussion further.

You can download the document “Toward Age-friendly Design” from ILC-Brazil website, in Publications section. The translation into Portuguese and Spanish is underway and will be online soon. The edited video version of the presentations will be soon available too.

Written by Ina Voelcker, ILC-Brazil 

Picture: Speakers of the 4th International Longevity Forum

ILC GA NY representative Muriel Beach served on the main panel of the annual Pfizer innovation gathering known as nEXt – “Building Bridges to the Future” on November 1, 2016 in New York.

The event drew an audience of several hundred from over thirty counties and reached a further three thousand people through live streaming. Muriel was invited to respond to the statement " how do older adults stay young?" Muriel responded by saying:

"I reject this question on the grounds it is ageism. Older adults age it is the normal process of the life cycle. We do not stay young. We are old but continue to live full and vibrant lives as older adults. We are a gold mine of assets, talents, experience, and continue to make substantial contributions to our communities. Robert Butler coined the expression ageism to describe the negative views of older adults and when you ask a question like this, it is ageism.

I believe the question you intended was how do older adults stay healthy? Alex Kalache wrote that healthy aging is active aging. I would like to see Pfizer reach out to older adults and develop programs utilizing their services keeping them active and healthy. We need your collaboration and your partnership.

Fellow panellist and Executive Director of Older Adults Technology Services, Thomas Kamber observed," it was the best answer I've ever heard anyone give on a panel. It was electrifying. She called them out on their bias, explained how they were wrong and how they might think differently about things and then she asked for their partnership. "

Since this was a young audience, increased intergenerational understanding of elders and aging was achieved through this response by Muriel.

 

Author: Muriel Beach
Conference photo courtesy: Tom Kamber

 

 

 

The inaugural Baroness Greengross Lecture was held in London on 23 November in celebration of the major contributions Sally Greengross has made to improve the lives of older people throughout her lifetime. A spirited and lively informal lecture was delivered by writer, journalist and television presenter, Angela Rippon OBE.

Following a welcome by Tom Wright CBE, Chief Executive of Age UK which organized the lecture, Angela Rippon shared her personal reflections on ageing focusing on the “joys, challenges, responsibilities and rewards of ageing.”

The joys of ageing are numerous and include “seeing the growth of children and young colleagues as well as witnessing history” according to Rippon. And although challenges are also many for older persons, she stressed that "it is important to recognize that it is never too late to learn something new” and spoke of the importance of older persons remaining open to learning new skills and continuing to challenge themselves.

Ageing also comes with responsibilities. Ms. Rippon asserted, “we should take responsibility for our own lives .. maintaining a healthy life style and doing proper exercises…. We also have a responsibility to support those who are vulnerable and need help.” Rippon stressed that older persons “should not waste their knowledge, wisdom, and experience, as we have a responsibility to leave the world a better place than [when] we started.”

Ms. Rippon also said that the ability to become one’s true self, rather than conforming to other people’s expectations of us is a major reward of ageing. “We should make every day, month, and year of our remaining lives a store of precious memory.”

Rippon concluded her speech, saying, “Ageing gives us an opportunity to look back and look forward to these four features I have talked about.” And she congratulated Sally for her life long commitment and contributions toward improving the lives of older persons.

Having thanked Ms. Rippon and Age UK, Baroness Sally Greengross responded, “I was truly inspired by Angela’s reflections.” She added that we needed to speak to people of all ages about ageing.

A middle aged woman who attended the lecture shared her view: “I am so encouraged by Angela’s message that it is never too late to learn something new. And Sally is a genuine role model for us. I cannot wait to attend the next Baroness Greengross Lecture.”

Baroness Greengross, CEO of ILC UK and Co-president of ILC Global Alliance, has been an independent crossbench member of the House of Lords since 2000 and chairs three All-Party Parliamentary Groups: Corporate Social Responsibility, Intergenerational Futures: Old & Young Together and Continence Care. She is the Vice Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia and Ageing and Older People, and is Treasurer of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Equalities.

Celebrated broadcaster journalist, and presenter, Angela Rippon is a dedicated supporter of issues relating to ageing. She has written fourteen books. A BBC newsreader for five years, Angela has worked in news and current affairs for over 40 years. She has been awarded the OBE for her services to broadcasting, charity, and the arts.

Written by Masako Osako, International Longevity Center Global Alliance Secretariat

Civicus and IDS (Instituto de Democracia e Sustentabilidade), with support of IABS (Instituto Brasileiro de Desenvolvimento e Sustentabilidade) brought together about 20 representatives of Brazilian CSOs.

The meeting organized by Civicus and IDS (Instituto de Democracia e Sustentabilidade), with support of IABS (Instituto Brasileiro de Desenvolvimento e Sustentabilidade) brought together about 20 representatives of Brazilian CSOs involved in the work on the SDGs.

After the opening, Haroldo Machado Filho, focal point on the Agenda 2030 at UNDP Brazil presented the SDGs, highlighting the differences between the MDGs and the SDGs and the importance of quantifying the goals in order to monitor progress. According to Haroldo, the statistical instruments to collect and analyse this data are not yet developed. He also mentioned an event organized by the IBGE (National Statistics Bureau) next week about the measurement of the SDGs. Haroldo also stressed that no country has reached sustainable development yet and that the achievement of the SDGs therefore needs to be a real collective effort, especially because no government will be able to do it alone. The support from the private sector, academia, CSO and the media is indispensable to reach the goals. He also highlighted that the SDGs cannot be seen in separate boxes, i.e. in isolation, despite being graphically shown in little boxes. He also presented the Agenda 2030 platform (agenda2030.com.br) and asked for feedback on it. He further highlighted that there are still very few indicators on the platform because the IAEG has not yet agreed on many internationally comparable indicators.

Petrina Santos who works for Civicus presented the results of the questionnaire that was completed by about 65 organizations in the second semester of 2016.

A few highlights on ageing and older people:
15% of the organizations that responded to the questionnaire (total of 65) said that older people were one of their target groups compared to 35% for women. The groups that most benefit from the work of the participating organizations are:

• Children and youth
• Low-income communities and favelas
• Women
• Others
• Black people
• Older people
• Unemployed people

Of the organizations working on ageing, 56% thought that there were few results in terms of public policy, while 38% thought there were moderate results. In most of the groups there was only a small percentage that thought that there were positive results or no results at all.

After these presentations the group discussed how these results can be used, if it is useful to plan a new questionnaire for 2017, whether and how the shadow report should be produced by the CSO and what next steps are. The importance of the research was widely recognised and it was suggested that it should be used to sensitize the population and other CSOs about the SDGs, despite its various limitations. It was also agreed that it would be necessary to have a communications strategy to disseminate the work and the importance of the SDGs for Brazil.

The participants suggested to have access to the information about the organisations that participated in the research so that each organisation can analyse who was reached and who should be engaged in the future. Ina Voelcker of ILC-Brazil who represented the Stakeholder Group on Ageing shared her impression with the group that very few organizations working with older people have an understanding of the SDGs and their relevance to their work, at local and national level. She stressed that at international level the Stakeholder Group as a strong voice having managed to influence the development of the SDGs.

Both, Development Initiatives and Datapedia presented sources of data for the monitoring of the SDGs and suggested that this should be used for the development of the Shadow Report which is due in the beginning of 2017.

Petrina Santos presenting the results of the research on SDGs.

Haroldo Machado Filho of UNDP Brazil at the opening of the meeting.

 

Ina Voelcker
Diretora técnica / Technical director
Centro Internacional de Longevidade Brasil / International Longevity Centre Brazil

 

The November issue of the UN Special magazine is dedicated to older persons.

Our representative in Geneva wrote an article about the importance of combatting ageism and describes the work of the NGO Committee on Ageing in Geneva. 

Read the article 
https://www.unspecial.org/2016/11/take-a-stand-against-ageism/

Or download the whole issue:
https://www.unspecial.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/UNSPECIAL_Novembre2016-web.pdf

The Executive Committee of the NGO Committee on Ageing with the Independent Expert, Ms Rosa Kornfeld Mate, following a Human Rights Council side event on older refugees.

 

Side event at the 33rd session of the Human Rights Council organized by the Group of Friends of Older Persons. On the panel, The State Secretary of Slovenia, the ambassadors of Namibia and Singapore, the deputy permanent representative from Brazil, The Independent Expert on the Rights of Older Persons, Representative from Age Platform Europe and the Chair of the NGO Committee on Ageing as moderator.

Silvia Perel-Levin
International Longevity Centre Global Alliance (ILC GA) representative to the UN, Geneva

From the 17th - 20th October 2016, ILC Brazil participated in the third United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (UN Habitat III) in Quito, Ecuador.

The conference successfully concluded with the adoption of the New Urban Agenda. At the conference we discussed the big challenges that cities will be facing in the future and how this New Urban Agenda can orientate countries and cities towards a sustainable urbanisation for the next 20 years.

The conference counted with the participation of more than 30.000 people from 167 countries. During the four days of the event almost 1000 different events were held. Among them, roundtable discussions and special sessions which specifically addressed population ageing and the challenges arising from it.

The Older Persons Partner Constituent Group, which defends older persons’ human rights in the discussions, organised a roundtable with participation of representatives from HelpAge International and the Global Alliance of ILCs. The representatives also actively participated in sessions on mobility, the rights of persons with disabilities, urban spaces and inclusive cities in which they drew attention to the fact that especially developing countries are experiencing rapid population ageing and that this results in new challenges for cities.

During the concluding high-level plenary session, Katherine Kline, co-chair of the Older Persons Partner Constituent Group delivered a statement on older persons’ human rights in the context of urbanisation, which was drafted by representatives of AARP, the NGO Ageing Committee Geneva, HelpAge International and ILC-Brazil. The two co-chairs of the Group also met with Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary General of the UN, and had a chance to share their experience in representing older persons’ rights in the process leading to UN Habitat III with him.

Photo credit: UN Habitat

Photo credit: UN Habitat

On October 6 and 7, 2016, the International Longevity Centre Brazil (ILC-Brazil) held the 4th International Longevity Forum with Bradesco Seguros being the main sponsor. The Forum also counts on the support of Galderma and other institutional partners (SBGG, UnATi/UERJ and the Global Alliance of ILCs).

The Forum, which discussed the role of technology and design in an ageing society, brought together over 30 national and international experts from fields ranging from architecture to social work and from cosmology to tourism. The Forum was videotaped and an edited version of the presentations will become available in due course.

Another product, a blueprint or manifesto, is also being elaborated with the support of a group of designers. Two core components of the Active Ageing Policy Framework will inform and guide the process toward the creation of this document – the protagonism of older adults and the adoption of a comprehensive life-course perspective. The hope is to prompt younger professionals in the design and technology arenas to reflect on their own ageing and to find inspiration in the opportunities presented to everyone by age neutral or age-friendly design – i.e. design that is friendly to all ages. Additionally, it is hoped that this document will act as a license for older adults to reassess their relationship to design and to assert their role in the design process.

As a tangible product of the 4th International Longevity Forum, the document is intended to guide researchers, service and product developers from both the private and public spheres, entrepreneurs, businesses and the general public. The central principal is that services, products, information, communications and their applications must be developed on the needs, the demands and the partnership of all ultimate users, including older adults.

To access the full programme click here.

ILC Brazil

The new course ‘Healthy Ageing in 6 Steps. Let your environment do the work’ starts 1 December 2016 on online learning platform edX. Learn how to make healthy choices and adjustments to your lifestyle and environment to help you live a healthier, happier and longer life.

Learn how to make healthy choices and adjustments to your lifestyle and environment to help you live a healthier, happier and longer life. The brand new course ‘Healthy Ageing in 6 Steps. Let your environment do the work’, co-developed by Leyden Academy on Vitality and Ageing, starts 1 December 2016 on online learning platform edX.

Mismatch between old genes and modern environment
Instructor Dr David van Bodegom explains: “Many health complaints, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes or joint problems seem inescapable diseases of old-age, but originate mostly from our lifestyle. A lifestyle that is dictated much in part by our environment. The mismatch between our ‘old’ genes – our evolutionary heritage – and the ‘modern’ environment is the reason that we cannot resist the constant stimuli that seduce us to make unhealthy choices. Do’s and don’ts cannot help us.”

A radically different approach to healthy ageing
Co-instructor Professor Rudi Westendorp adds: “This health course will take a radically different approach to showing you how to secure a lifestyle which will keep you healthy as you grow older. We have to let the environment do the work for us. By making small changes at our home, work, school or neighbourhood, healthier choices can become easier or even unconscious.”

Virtual excursions to Copenhagen and Ghent
Practical assignments will provide participants with the skills to re-design their daily environments to promote healthy, longer lives for themselves and their family, colleagues and neighbours – all the people with whom they share their re-designed environments. Participants will learn how to create their own healthy living zone. The course includes virtual excursions to Copenhagen, Denmark and to Ghent, Belgium to watch and learn how the environment can help you live a longer, healthier and happier life.

Free course on learning platform edX
This free course ‘Healthy Ageing in 6 Steps’ was developed by the EIT Health partners Leyden Academy on Vitality and Ageing, University of Copenhagen and TU Delft. The course is published on edX, an online learning platform founded by Harvard University and MIT in 2012. EdX is one of the largest MOOC (massive open online course) providers and offers high-quality courses from the world’s best universities and institutions to learners everywhere. In 2016, edX has more than 7 million students taking more than 700 courses online.

Please view the course trailer here: https://youtu.be/sCzZgSw4Xm8

For more details and to sign up for this course, please visit the edX learning platform.

A two day National Consultation on “Challenges and Opportunities of an Ageing Society” was organized by ILC-I with the support of Gharda Chemicals Ltd. on 18th and 19th of August, 2016 at YASHADA, Pune.

The objective of this National Consultation was to have the best minds in the field of gerontology to first identify the challenges through discussions on the current issues of elderly and then the measures to address these challenges and seek solutions which would prove that an ageing society can be the opportunity to showcase “Productive Ageing”.

As a nation’s population ages due to increased longevity, declining fertility and falling mortality rates, there are certain challenges that emerge as an outcome of the changed demographic scenario. The negative images and stereotypes of ageing, the myths associated with it, the lack of awareness about the issue and unwillingness to accept it as ‘an issue that needs the attention of society and the government’, become hurdles and obstacles that pose challenges to an ageing society, especially of a developing nation like India.

The challenges of longevity impact the health, financial and social aspects of an older person in particular, as also the community/society in general, and as the numbers of these older persons increase, these challenges need to be converted into opportunities, so that the ‘Challenge of Longevity’ becomes an ‘Opportunity for Productive Ageing.’

Population ageing is not and should not be considered as an ‘unwanted burden’, rather it is a treasure-house of knowledge, wisdom and experience and this bounty needs to be channelized in the right direction and used for alleviating not just the conditions of the older persons, but also those of society too. For this, it is imperative that the older persons themselves get rid of this ridiculous and untrue notion of being a drag on society and rather build upon their gained knowledge and experience and put it to good use through various ways for the betterment of society.

To get the scene rolling, we had focused on the challenges in the health sector, the market labour situation, the present social protection systems, the infrastructural set-up, and of course on the emotional or social needs of the elders.

Effort was also made to come up with broad solutions like encouraging entrepreneurship by older persons, volunteerism by seniors and the senior citizens’ movements as the means to overcome the challenges that come along in the wake of an ageing society and thus enable the empowerment of the elderly and nurture productive ageing.

Group discussions on how to come up with more specific measures and solutions to the challenges of longevity and make an ageing society an opportunity for the older persons to make life more qualitative, not just for themselves, but also for the community in general, were the essence of this National Consultation.

The Consultation focused on the challenges in the health sector, the market labour situation, the present social security systems, and the infrastructure set-up and on the emotional or social needs of the elders in India. The Consultation included renowned experts from all over India, research scholars, academicians, representatives of NGOs, gerontologists and geriatricians as well as the delegates of senior citizens’ organizations of India.

The outcome of the Consultation was the formulation of a “Plan of Action” based on the presentations by the experts and group discussions and interactions of the participants during the two days of the workshop.

A Pune Declaration citing the goals and objectives as also the recommendations of the Consultation was drafted and after its finalization with the consent of the delegates will be sent to the concerned authorities.

The inauguration session was held on the 18th of August 2016 in the presence of PadmaVibhushan Dr. R. A. Mashelkar (Hon. President, ILC-I), Dr. K. R. Gangadharan (President, Heritage Hospitals) and Mr. Jayant Umranikar (Chairman, ILC-I). Mrs. Anjali Raje, Executive Director of ILC-I welcomed the guests.

The experts who were invited to speak on the occasion were- Mr. Mathew Cherian, CEO, HelpAge India, who delivered the Valedictory Address and Dr. Siva Raju, Dean, School of Development Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences & Hon. Director, ILC-I.

Others who spoke on the occasion were- Dr. S. P. Kinjawadekar, President-Emeritus, All India Senior Citizens Association (AISCCON), Mr. D. N. Chapke, President, AISCCON, Mr. Sailesh Mishra, Founder-President, Silver Innings, Mr. P. Borgaonkar, Director, HelpAge India, Mr. D. T. Chaudhary, Dr. Alka Vyas, Dr. Jacob John, Dr. P. K. B. Nair, Dr. Nidhi Gupta.

 

ILC-India

ILC-I organized a lecture and an interactive session between the senior citizens of Pune and the Police Commissioner of Pune, Ms. Rashmi Shukla, on the 2nd of July 2016, at the Cummins Hall, Patrakar Bhavan, Pune from 10 to 1.00 am to mark the occasion of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.

Instead of marking it on the globally acknowledged date of the 15th of June, ILC-I had to hold the programme on the 2nd of July due to a change of plans of the Chief Guest for the occasion, Ms. Rashmi Shuklar, the Police Commissioner of Pune.

This programme was organized by ILC-I with the support of Gharda Chemicals.

The highlight of the programme was the interaction that Ms. Shukla had with the senior citizens who had gathered there.

Dr. R. A. Mashelkar, the President of ILC-I presided over the function.

Mr. Jayant Umranikar, Chairman, ILC-I, delivered the opening remarks and Ms. Anjali Raje, the Executive Director, ILC-I, welcomed the guests on the occasion.

 

ILC-India

A one day workshop on “Orientation of Seniors as Volunteers for the Niramay Arogya Seva Project (Healthy Living)”  was jointly organized by the Association of Senior Citizens’ Organisations of Pune (ASCOP) and the International Longevity Centre-India (ILC-I) with the support of GHARDA CHEMICALS LTD on the 3rd of August 2016 in Pune.

The Niramay Arogya Seva (Healthy Living) Project is an initiative of ASCOP which promotes silver years to be mentally, physically, emotionally, financially and socially qualitative and satisfying, as every older person has a Right to Health.

This ‘Healthy Living’ project works on the principle of active older persons who volunteer to provide their services to ensure good health for those elders who are living alone or by themselves.

This includes visiting such elders, communicating with them on a regular basis, monitoring their needs, especially those of health, taking them to the doctor or hospital as and when required, getting them their medicines/ assistive devices.

ASCOP, under this project has also worked out tie-ups with reputed hospitals, doctors, chemists and other health or caregiving services and facilities to make them available to the elders at concessional rates. Efforts are also on to facilitate medical insurance for the elderly.

Nearly 100 active senior citizens have volunteered their services under this project and it was with a view to orienting them to this project and what it entails, that, ASCOP and ILC-I, jointly organized this orientation workshop for these volunteers, with the support of Gharda Chemicals Ltd.

Experts spoke on several issues that provided information to the elderly volunteers on what is expected of them, the areas where their voluntary services are required, what are the values that a good volunteer must have and other such issues.

The workshop was inaugurated by Mr. Jayant Umranikar, Chairman, ILC-I.

The other guests on the occasion were Ms. Anjali Raje, Executive Director, ILC-I and Dr. (Ms.) Alka Vyas, geriatrician. Dr. R. T. Wazarkar, President, ASCOP, Mr. Madhukar Pawar, Executive President, ASCOP and Mr. V. V. Kulkarni, programme-in-charge welcomed the guests and the volunteers who had gathered there to be oriented and trained for this project.

Topics covered included information on organ donation facilities, assistive device centres, pathology labs, medicine banks, counselling and physiotherapy facilities.

The programme ended with a questions and answers session to resolve the doubts and questions that the volunteers had and to which the concerned expert responded in detail.

 

ILC-India

ILC GA leads and participates in high-level discussions on the human rights of older persons at the 16th session of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and at the 33rd session of the Human Rights Council (HRC), at the UN in Geneva.

Two technical briefings on the human rights of older persons were held at the CRPD last month. The main target audience of the technical briefings were the members of the CRPD, but the events were also open to the public.


1) Friday, 19 August 2016: The Open-ended Working Group on Ageing and the UN Treaty Bodies

This briefing was organised by the International Longevity Centre Global Alliance (ILC GA) and the NGO Committee on Ageing, Geneva, with the support of Age International as a contribution to the substantial discussions building up to the upcoming 33rd session of the Human Rights Council (13-30 September 2016) in Geneva and the Open-ended Working Group (OEWG) on Ageing in New York (12-15 December 2016).

Presenting to the members of the CRPD committee, representatives from Member States, UN and NGOs, the briefing focused on the current state of the OEWG, the main arguments in favour of and against a Convention on the rights of older persons, what specific rights such an instrument might include, and what are the distinctions and intersections with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The point was strongly made about the existing protection gap and the urgency to move from debate to action.

The event was moderated by Silvia Perel-Levin, ILC GA representative in Geneva and Chair of the NGO Committee on Ageing, Geneva. Speakers were Klemen Ponikvar, from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Slovenia to the UN in Geneva and Nena Georgantzi from AGE Platform Europe. 
Some key points that members of the Committee raised during the discussion:

  • It is a timely issue as older persons with disabilities have not been covered enough by CRPD.
  • A request that civil society organisations provide the Committee with short briefs in relation to the specific countries that are being examined or under discussion by the Committee. This will assist the Committee in asking specific questions about older people with disabilities to reporting governments.
  • Aware that CRPD does not cover all inequalities experienced by older persons, a call was made to make sure that “we do not undermine one right by giving another”. Careful attention must be paid to ensure that a focus on the rights of older persons do not undermine the achievements of the disability movement.
  • The importance of lifelong learning and technology to maintain autonomy.


2) Thursday, 25 August 2016: Access to CRPD by persons with Dementia

Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) and Dementia Alliance International (DAI) organised this briefing. Executive Director of ADI, Marc Wortman, moderated the event and panelists were Glen Rees, Chairman of ADI and Peter Mittler, Human Rights Advisor for DAI.

Strong statements such as “Dementia receives the worst care in the developed world” quoting a study by OECD, highlighted the fact that high-income countries have badly neglected people with dementia and that discrimination against older persons with dementia is a universal problem.

The CRPD Committee was called on to include dementia in the List of Issues, General Comments and Thematic Briefings of the CRPD and to monitor the extent to which persons living with dementia are included in the implementation of the Convention by Member States.

CRPD members agreed with the importance of including people with dementia in their discussions and made the connections with the briefing on older persons the previous week. Comments and questions by CRPD members included:

  • “If you see yourself in article 1, then you are included in CRPD. No need to ask others to include you”.
  • The importance to navigate the possible conflicts between the medicalization of the issue and a human rights approach.
  • The importance of new technologies in all social, clinical and other services.
  • The importance to include family and caregivers support in the discussions.
  • How many countries have human rights-based laws on older persons with dementia?


3) The 33rd session of the Human Rights Council takes place 13-30 September. Older Persons are on the agenda. Here are some highlights:

  • On Wednesday 14 September 12:00-15:00, Ms Rosa Kornfeld Matte, Independent Expert on the rights of older persons presents her report to the Human Rights Council. The report can be found here with and addendum on her recent country visit to Costa Rica. The session, and all the HRC can be followed online.
  • The Geneva Group of Friends of Older Persons organises an event on human rights of older persons: imperatives & desiderata with the participation of the Independent Expert. ILC GA representative in Geneva will moderate the session.
  • Two photo exhibitions on older persons will be features at the UN in Geneva during the HRC organized by Alzheimer’s Disease International and the Mission of Argentina.
  • A side event Respecting, Protecting, and Fulfilling the Rights of Older Refugees is organized by the members of the NGO Committee on Ageing.
  • Argentina and Brazil are proposing a resolution on the rights of older persons, which will include the renewal of the mandate of the IE.

 

Friday, 19 August 2016: The Open-ended Working Group on Ageing and the UN Treaty Bodies
Left to right (front row): Nena Georgantzi (Age Platform Europe), Silvia Perel-Levin (ILC GA representative in Geneva and Chair of the NGO Committee on Ageing, Geneva), Klemen Ponikvar (Permanent Mission of the Republic of Slovenia to the UN in Geneva)
. Photography by Nigel Kingston
 

The Centre of Expertise in Longevity and Long-Term Care, a member of the ILC–Global Alliance, is proud to share experiences with clinical implementation of a newly accredited dance therapy course for older adults with dementia, and their care providers.

Benefits of physical activity for older adults, even the frail ones or those with dementia, are well known and well documented. Our research team studied the effect of a simple dance-based exercise called EXDASE (Exercise Dance for Seniors) on various outcomes among nursing home residents. The results were presented in several scientific articles (titles and abstracts of the major ones are available on PubMed – for more details follow the links below).

The author of the dance therapy intervention is one of our colleagues, Petr Veleta, PhD. He has been dancing with older adults for several years now. Because the response and reactions of older adults to dance sessions are more than favorable, Petr decided to develop a one-day course for older adults with dementia, and their care providers. The course, titled “Music and movement as an activation and communication tool for the older adults with dementia and their care providers”, was accredited by Czech Alzheimer Association and Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, and in summer 2016 it was successfully implemented in ten nursing homes in the Czech Republic.

The course consists of two half-day sessions one month apart instead of originally planned one day session. It was preferred by both participants as well as the instructor. The first part is focused on theoretical issues and includes topics such as dance session preparation, music selection, contact initiation, physical activity vocabulary, reminiscence, emotions, motivation, appreciation or non-verbal and positive communication. The second part is based on practical demonstrations. The reactions were great. Most of  the 123 participants evaluated the course as exceptional and very useful. Older adults who took part in the practical demonstrations participated with enthusiasm and expressed enjoyment.

The fact that the combination of physical activity and music can raise strong and memorable emotions among older adults with dementia seems to be confirmed once again. We would like to share one of Petr´s experiences that speaks for all: During a practical demonstration Petr invited a lady to dance the waltz. She was very pleased and told Petr that she very much enjoyed the last time they danced waltz together… she suffered from severe dementia and Petr danced in that nursing home five years earlier. Is it possible that she remembered?

Effect of the Exercise Dance for Seniors (EXDASE) program on lower-body functioning among institutionalized older adults
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19934443

The effect of dance on depressive symptoms in nursing home residents
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24913212

Dance as Prevention of Late Life Functional Decline Among Nursing Home Residents
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26320145


  

ILC-Czech Republic

The Faculty of Humanities of Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic is delighted to launch a new postgraduate program called “Longevity studies”.

A major patron of this program is the Centre of Expertise in Longevity and Long-term care, a member of the ILC–Global Alliance, and most of its experts will serve as mentors and lecturers.

This 4-year program is designed to appeal to all students who successfully complete a master degree in a broad range of specialties and who want to establish a foundation in issues of aging and apply it in their clinical or theoretical careers. The aim of the course is to help address the multidimensional and complex nature of lengthening human lifespan from various perspectives.

We are very proud to announce that this is the first and so far only postgraduate program in the Czech Republic that focuses on such an important, and at the same time challenging, topic.

On Wednesday 9th November, ILC-UK will be holding its second Future of Ageing Conference featuring both UK and international speakers.

Our first conference, described by one delegate as ‘one of the best conferences I have ever attended’, was held in November 2015. The conference assembled experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society.

The 2016 conference will take place at Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH, UK, on Wednesday 9th November and we expected to welcome over 200 delegates made up of business leaders; charity sector experts; public sector decision makers; local authority staff; academics; and senior journalists.

Confirmed speakers for the 2016 ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • The Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell, Chair, NHS Confederation
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, Author and Broadcaster
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

Early Bird tickets are currently available until the end of August 2016 when the tickets will increase to the full rate.

For more information about the conference, sponsorship opportunities and to purchase conference tickets, please visit the link below:
The Future of Ageing 2016
 

On July 29th the City of Veranopolis (RS) in the south of Brazil launched its Age-friendly Action Plan based on rigorous research with older people. The project is being developed as part of a public/private partnership between ILC-Brazil and CPFL Energia SA.

ILC-Brazil has established a public/private partnership to develop a Brazil-fit Age-friendly Cities model that can be applied throughout the South and South-East of the country. The project is financed by CPFL Energia SA, one of Brazil's largest energy providers - a company with a strong commitment to sustainability. The project utilises a federal law that offers companies and individuals the opportunity to pass a small percentage of their income tax on to a fund for older persons that is administered by the Council of Older Persons.

On July 29th 2016 the Age-friendly Action Plan of the City of Veranopolis (RS) in the south of Brazil was launched. Known for the longevity of it's population, the city has additionally been a focus of longitudinal research on ageing since the 1990s. Over a thousand citizens were involved in the initial evaluation which formed the basis of the development plan. Having completed the first phase, the Municipality is now committed to the implementation. The Mayor of Veranopolis formalised the request to join the Global Age-friendly Cities and Communities Network of the World Health Organisation at the Brazilian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology Rio Grande do Sul winter conference.

Photo credits: Guilherme Augusto Zatti Pulita

From the left to the right: Edson Severo Braz, Head of Public Relations of RGE, a CPFL Energia company; Neide Maria Bruscato, President of the Council of Older Persons; Ina Voelcker, Project Coordinator, ILC-Brazil; Carlos Alberto Spanhol, Mayor of Veranópolis; Andreia Ferreira, CPFL Energia; Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil; Emílio Moriguchi, professor at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul; Carlo Pereira, Head of Sustainability of CPFL Energia.

El Dia, one of the most read newspapers of the Dominican Republic invited Dr. Rosy Pereyra, President of ILC-DR, Vice President of INPEA and one of the pioneers of geriatrics in the country, to talk about the situation of older adults in a space denominated Colloquium of El Dia to which every week an important person of the Dominican society is invited.

Dr. Pereyra expressed sadness when recognizing that the country lacks public policies to protect the aged.  “Despite the fact that the older population is growing and today represents 10% of the total, the government does not seem to be considering to include in its short-term plans the development of any action to attend the needs of that group”.

The situation is very difficult, 59% of people over 60 are below poverty line and of them 24% are indigents.  Only 12% of older adults have a pension, because the majority of them, till 30 years ago, worked in the rural area in informal jobs and therefore did not contribute to social security, Dr. Pereyra said.

Furthermore, though the country has a new Social Security Law put in action 15 years ago and it stablishes a non-contributory pension equivalent to US$100 dollars a month, the Government has not implemented that regime because they prefer to have an action called Solidarity Card that offers a group of people the amount of US$20 dollars a month. According to Dr. Pereyra this shows that the Government considers older people objects of charity and not subjects, in other words, owners of rights. However, that has been beneficial for the party in power, because poor people vote for them to keep the little money that they get not knowing that they are being deceived because by law, they should get much more.

Dr. Pereyra spoke about the work of ILC-DR which has been empowering older people and showing them their rights so that they can demand them.

She also talked about the incidence of abuse and the very bad health coverage which affects the older population and about her concern because the Dominican Republic has not signed the Latin American Convention for Human Rights of Older Adults, an essential instrument to guarantee that older persons’ rights are respected and protected.

ILC Dominican Republic

Aging 2.0 promotes aging-focused Start-ups in its periodic pitch events where entrepreneurs are given a platform to display their products or services before an audience and a panel of judges.

The latest of these events was held in New York City on May 19th where nine new Start-ups made their presentations.

ILC-GA Representative, Muriel Beach, was one of the members of the intergenerational panel of judges. Other judges were Stephen Johnson (President of Aging 2.0), Patrick Freuler (Audicus), and Jason Shulman (Corigan Ventures). Crispin Baynes (Aging 2.0 NYC Representative) moderated the event. In the evaluation of the products, Muriel brought an older-age perspective and raised a number of concerns about the adequacy of some of the designs.

At the end of the event, she addressed the audience with a reminder of the absolute need to properly consult older people when designing for their needs. "Nothing for us, without us".

The image below shows Muriel with two young developers of a new walker. As someone who has used a walker for ten years, Muriel had much to say about their product and they have arranged to have an on-going dialogue about the evolving design in a truly intergenerational collaboration.

On 3-6 May 2016, the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) celebrated its first 20 years. Collaborators from across Australia gathered to present findings from the study, and to discuss how researcher can be translated into policy.

ALSWH involves more than 58,000 women including three original cohorts recruited in 1996, and a new cohort of young women recruited in 2013. Over the past 20 years the study team have processed close to 250,000 survey papers, capturing information on 114 million variables. The women have also made more than 56,000 free text comments. Through these surveys we have been chronicling women’s experiences on everything from weight and exercise to mental health, life stages and how they utilise health services, with results presented in almost 600 hundred peer-reviewed papers, as well as major reports. The oldest women in the study were aged 70—75 years when the study began in 1996, and they are now 90-95, with over 4000 of the 12432 women who commenced the study still alive. Many of these women are still living in the community and describe themselves as in good health. Of the 65% of the women who died, around 30% were admitted to residential aged care during their later years. Through linked health and aged care data we are examining the women’s use of primary care, hospital, community care, and long-term care services over the course of their later life.

The study is also now at an exciting stage where we are seeing cross-over in the age of our original cohorts, and we also have a 20-year comparison in the 18 to 23 age group with our original and new young cohorts.

More information about the study can be found at www.alswh.org.au.

The information collected from women in the 1921-26 cohort of ALSWH provides a unique opportunity to understand the balance between healthy and productive ageing, supportive care, and greater levels of dependency, higher care needs and service use. Our survey data, provided by the women from when they were aged 70-75 years, allow longitudinal information on changes in health, function, activities and supports available to the women. The linked data provide detailed longitudinal information on their service use across different aged care services and settings and over time. Together this is a powerful and informative dataset that can be used to answer many important strategic, policy relevant questions about ageing and the care that women need and receive over the course of their later life.

Women in the 1921-26 cohort are now aged 90-95 years of age. Many of these women continue to participate in the six monthly surveys, providing detailed information about the health and health care needs of very old women. 

Between 1996 and May 2014, 8027 (65%) of the original 12,432 participants in the cohort had died, and 2089 had requested no more surveys. Response rates for the remaining participants are around 80-90% at each follow-up. Six monthly surveys continue to be mailed to these women on a rolling basis (six months after return of the last survey, or six-months after the last mail out if no response has been received). Some participants elect to complete their surveys over the telephone, and some other surveys are also completed “by proxy”: including telephone interviews, around 11% of women relay their answers to someone else, and another 6% of surveys are completed by another person on behalf of the participant.

The 1921-26 cohort summary provides results for women who had survived up to May 2013 (when the women were aged 87-92) - available at http://www.alswh.org.au/images/content/pdf/Cohort_summaries/ALSWH_1921-2_%20cohort_summary.pdf

  • At age 70 to 75 years 30% of the women were widowed, and 80% were widowed by 85 to 90 years. The percentage of women living alone showed a corresponding increase from 35% to almost 60%.
  • Most of the women lived in a house, though the percentage has declined from 75% to 58% over the study period, while the percentage of women in a retirement village, nursing home, or in a hostel doubled from around 10% to 20%.
  • Changes in SF-36 sub-scale scores showed a slight decline for the mean score for mental health, and a marked decline in the mean score for physical functioning.
  • The percentage of women who reported needing help from others for daily tasks due to long-term illness rose fourfold, from 8% at age 70 to 75 years to 34% by age 87 to 92 years. This change was also evident in the increase of scores that assess difficulties with activities of daily living (such as dressing and bathing) and instrumental activities of daily living (such as cooking and driving).
  • Women were also likely to be caring for others because of that person’s illness or disability. At age 70-75, women were twice as likely to be caring for someone else (17%) than needing care for themselves. By Survey 6, this ratio was reversed, with around 10% of women aged 85-90 years caring for another person.  The percentage of women who reported providing care for children on at least an occasional basis declined from 45% at age 73 to 78 years to 14% at 85 to 90 years.
     

Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Julie Byles, Professor Wendy Brown, and Professor Margot Schofield cutting the cake to celebrate 20 years of ALSWH.

A very powerful civil society organization called Citizens Participation which is the Dominican Chapter of International Transparency invited Dr. Rosy Pereyra, President of ILC Dominican Republic to participate in a dialog table to discuss the challenges and Perspectives of Public Policies for Older Adults.

Recognizing the need to implement effective policies for older adults in the Dominican Republic and the fact the our country has not still signed the Latin American Convention on Human Rights for older adults, Citizens Participation, organized a dialog table to bring into attention of the Dominican Government the need for the Latin American Convention to be signed so that we can start the implementation of effective public policies in the light of MIPAA and the mentioned convention.

We were three panellists, Mrs Aracelys Azuara Representative of the Organization of American States in the Dominican Republic who spoke about the need of the implementation of the Latin American Convention on Human Rights for Older Adults, Miss Maria Fernanda Ortega, Secretary of the Dominican Network for Dignity in Old Age who spoke about the Dominican Code of Rights for Older Adults and the fact that after 18 years of its promulgation have not been fully implemented. Finally  Dr. Pereyra focused on the Madrid International Plan of Action and the difficulties in its implementation due to the fact that it does not have a binding mandate and so the need for a convention.

The activity was directed to representatives of NGO’s working with older adults and civil society organizations and received a wide press coverage.

 

ILC South Africa, the South African Care Forum and North-West University (Optentia Research Focus Area) with the The Albertina and Walter Sisulu Institute of Ageing in Africa (IAA), University of Cape Town presented two workshops (in Johannesburg and Cape Town) on Presence and Attentiveness in Care during February and March 2016.

Attended by more than 80 participants, these day-long workshops were facilitated by Prof Andries Baart from the Netherlands and Prof Vera Roos from North West University, South Africa.

The workshops kicked off by contextualising the importance of ethics in the context of the growing number of older persons that will be in need of social and health care. Many health and social work professionals deal with older persons on a daily basis and their ethical attitude and engagement is a core part of how they provide care, and central to the caring relationship.

The workshops then aimed at operationalizing an Ethics of Care approach to everyday care practices by introducing participants to the theory of presence: the moral importance of relations between people, emotions as a source of knowledge, vulnerability, and the practices of care as sources of moral understanding.

http://thecareeurope.com/?c=presence-approach&l=en
http://sa-careforum.co.za/
http://www.optentia.co.za/
http://www.instituteofageing.uct.ac.za/

In January, the Columbia Aging Center hosted Asghar Zaidi, PhD, Professor in International Social Policy at the University of Southampton for a lecture that was also a side event during the United Nations’ 54th Session of the Commission for Social Development.

Dr. Zaidi presented key findings of the European Active Ageing Index (AAI) and discussed how the index could be developed further to become a global measure of older people’s active and healthy aging and well-being.  Dr. John W. Rowe, faculty member of the Columbia Aging Center and the Mailman School of Public Health Department of Health Policy and Management, introduced Dr. Zaidi; and Dr. Ruth Finkelstein served as discussant.

Dr. Zaidi has led the research effort of the European Active Ageing Index project and more recently has begun a collaboration with HelpAge International, where he developed the Global AgeWatch index.


Left to right: Asghar Zaidi, Ruth Finkelstein (Associate Director, Columbia Aging Center), Ursula Staudinger (Director, Columbia Aging Center); and John W. Rowe (Columbia Aging Center Faculty Member)

 

Exceeding Expectations, the digital narrative project of the Columbia Aging Center, was recognized by the New York Press Association with its annual award for best news of feature story.

Conceived by Ruth Finkelstein and directed, created, and edited by Dorian Block, the series was recognized in April 2016 by the New York Press Association for the narrative featuring Hank Blum written by Heather Clayton Colangelo. Hank Blum, an 85-year-old retiree who can’t stay retired, is an example of someone who benefits from the workplace and the engagement that work provides.

Despite several attempts to retire, Dr. Blum currently works at Metro Optics, a small business that received the 2015 Age Smart Employer Award, an initiative of the Columbia Aging Center to recognize businesses with hiring practices that favor a workforce of all ages.

Dr Hank Blum

ILC-Brazil’s report on “Active Ageing: A Policy Framework in Response to the Longevity Revolution” is now available in three languages. Its translation into Spanish has been launched in May.

The Spanish translation of “Active Ageing: A Policy Framework in Response to the Longevity Revolution”, published by ILC-Brazil in English and Portuguese in 2015, has been launched at the School of Public Health of Andaluzia on 11th of May 2016.

The translation was produced with support from Mónica Roque (Government of Argentina), Mayte Sancho (Fundación Matía, Spain) and Victoria Vargas and Giulia Fernández (Escuela Andaluza de Salud Publica (EASP)).

The President of the Province of Granada (Diputación de Granada), José Entrena; the Director of EASP, Joan Carles March and ILC-Brazil’s President Alex Kalache presented at the launch and spoke about Granada’s proposal to expand its work on age-friendly municipalities.

Download the report here.

Contact details: info@ilcbrazil.org

 

Based on the World Health Organization’s criteria, this project entitled “Municipalities for All Ages” is being developed by ILC-Brazil in partnership with CPFL Energia S.A., one of Brazil’s biggest energy providers.

In Veranópolis, a town in the South of Brazil known for the longevity of its population and longitudinal research on ageing, the first steps towards becoming an age-friendly city have been made and an important milestone been reached – the presentation of the results of the research undertaken with participation of over 1000 older adults.

Since the beginning of the project in 2015, a community profile and an inventory of services and programmes have been produced, working committees been established and qualitative and quantitative field research been undertaken. During the course of the month of May, the findings are being written up in a research report and used to develop emblematic projects which will be part of a city-wide action plan.

The same methodology is now being applied in other Brazilian cities, such as Jaguariúna in the State of São Paulo.

Contact details: ina.voelcker@ilcbrazil.org

Representatives of the local research partner with Carlos Spanhol, the mayor of Veranópolis (far left), Neide Bruscato, President of the Municipal Council for Older People (second to the right), Dr. Berenice Werle, President of Brazilian Society of Geriatric and Gerontology/RGS (second to the left), Professor Emílio Moriguchi of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (third to the left) and Ina Voelcker from ILC-Brazil

 

Meeting in Jaguariúna with representatives of the local council for older people, CPFL Energia, the Secretary for Social Assistance, Unicamp and ILC-Brazil.

Collaborating with the Dominican Network for Dignity in Old Age, ILC Dominican Republic (ILC DR) organized a seminar on diabetes on the older adult on April7, World Health Day. In addition to Dr. Rosy Pereyra, President of IL DR, seminar participants included President of the Latin American Society of Diabetes, the Director of the State Program of Essential Drugs, and the Director of the Department of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion of the Ministry of Health.

Taking into account that the Dominican Republic  has-a prevalence of diabetes of 10.4%, that last year we had 505,700 cases of  the disease and with a death rate of 25.25 per 100,000, ranking 92 in the world, ILC-DR and the Dominican Network for Dignity in Old Age found in the call from WHO to dedicate World Health Day to call attention to this health problem, an opportunity to let people know that this is one of the very common non communicable diseases that if not properly diagnosed and treated puts a great burden on the health system and the family and produces incapacity and early death. For all those reasons, we decided to organize a seminar that counted with the sponsorship of Help Age International under its ADA Campaign.

The seminar attracted more than 100 people including professionals in the field of aging, health care and government and general population. Scanning for early detection of diabetes and polyneuropathy was provided to people attending the meeting.

This year WHO declared Diabetes as the health problem to bring to attention to the health systems of the world and the general population. See the first WHO Global report on diabetes here: http://www.who.int/diabetes/en/" target="_blank">http://www.who.int/diabetes/en/

ILC-I is privileged to be recognized as the United Nations’ International Institute on Ageing (UN INIA), Malta’s Satellite Centre for the SAARC region.

As the UN INIA Satellite Centre for the SAARC region, ILC-I held the ‘in-situ’ international training programme on “Social Gerontology’ in collaboration with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), from the 11th to the 15th of April 2016 at the TISS campus in Mumbai, India.UN

UN INIA/ILC-I’s International Training Programme on “Social Gerontology” by IntLongevityCentre

Francoise Forette and Laurence Dorlhac published in January 2016 a book dedicated to the role of an evidence based medicine for an healthy aging  “J’ai choisi de bien vieillir”.

Life expectancy continues to grow and living longer is no longer an unattainable dream.

The authors of “J’ai choisi de bien vieillir” wanted to fight preconceived ideas and stock phrases and have  collected in this book “evidenced based” medical advice.

Choosing healthy aging is to give oneself every chance to live an active, warm, serene and open to life older age.

Advocacy for prevention, this “four-handed” written book , is for all those who wish to age in good health.


Rio’s Museum of the Future invites the visitors to think about what kind of future we want for ourselves and coming generations. ILC-Brazil’s President spoke about longevity, one of the five core themes of the Museum, on February 16th.

Rio de Janeiro’s newest attraction, the Museum of the Future, discusses how choices made today will influence the world future generations will live in. The public is invited to reflect about several global trends, such as population ageing and climate change, and how these change our future.

Dr Kalache, President of the ILC-Brazil and member of the board of curators of the museum, provided the content for the Museum’s displays on longevity. On February 16th, he held a lecture on “Longevity: is it possible for everybody to live longer and better?”.  He invited the audience to think about the City’s not too far away future when two-thirds of the population of the famous Copacabana beach neighbourhood will be aged 60 and over. He also inspired people to think about their own process of ageing by making them recognise that it is a lifelong process and that there is a lot we can do, both at individual and societal level, to guarantee that people can age actively in a world in which a large proportion will be over 60.

The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and Hong Kong Association of Gerontology will be holding the “Gary Andrews Academy Workshop on Social Policy for the Aged” on 25-26th February, 2016 (Thursday & Friday) at the Hong Kong Association of Gerontology.

Professor Julie Byles (ILC-Australia) and Dr. Du Peng (ILC-China) join a list of experienced professionals will share their experiences within the Workshop. Below is the preliminary program rundown of the Workshop and registration form.

For more information of the Workshop, please refer to the below document or contact at Coco Woo on + (852) 2775 5756.

Gary Andrews Academy Workshop on Social Policy for the Aged_workshop

The Co-presidents of the ILC Global Alliance, Dr. Alex Kalache and Baroness Sally Greengross, have announced the appointment of three new Representatives to the United Nations, New York,  to expand its operations: Ms. Muriel Beach, Ms. Laurie Norris, and Ms. Morriseen Barmore.

Together with current ILC GA Representatives in New York, Drs. Lia Daichman, Ruth Finkelstein, and Masako Osako, they will work closely with the New York NGO committee on Aging and the Stakeholder Group on Aging.

Ms.Murial  Beach is a current vice president and past president of New York Statewide Senior Action Council  NYC Chapter. An experienced public speaker, she has served numerous committees, including the NGO Ageing Committee SubCommittee on Intergenerational  Relations, the UN International Day of Older Persons Planning Committee, the Community Advisory Committee of BRC a homeless shelter, the Executive Board of the Chelsea Reform Democratic Club, member of the Manhattan Borough President's Senior Advisory Committee. And under New York Statewide Senior Action Council Muriel has served several years on the State executive board  of that organization.

An experienced interviewer, writer, and project manager, Laurie Norris has worked cooperatively and independently on a range of projects involving foreign and domestic collaborations, including books on global health issues. She concentrates on healthy aging and patient advocacy, intergenerational and intercultural issues, and works with people at all stages of the life course. Laurie supports and oversees a series of worldview internships for college students at various organizations and an internship at the American Federation for Aging Research in honor of her late husband, Clarence Pearson. At the UN, Laurie is an active member of the NGO Committee on Ageing Subcommittee on Intergenerational Relationships, the UN International Day of Older Persons Planning Committee, and a writer of the 2015 IDOP event report.

Ms. Morriseen Barmore has many years of  experience as a  project management specialist. Through working closely with late Dr.Robert N. Butler, former CEO and founder of ILC USA, she has been extensively involved with organizations focusing on aging-related issues. She has a long-standing interest  in ethnicity and religion pertaining to the life of older persons. She is currently with the Edwin Gould Foundation.

With the addition of a seasoned public speaker (Ms. Beach), an accomplished writer/interviewer (Ms. Norris), and an experienced project manager (Ms. Barmore) to its New York team, the ILC Global Alliance looks forward to enhancing its effort in helping societies to address longevity and population ageing in positive and productive ways.

For details about the ILC Global Alliance, see: www.ilc-alliance.org.

Photograph - Clockwise from top left: Masako Osako, Laurie Norris, Morriseen Barmore and Muriel Beach.

For the last seven years, the Green Templeton College in Oxford hosts the Emerging Markets Symposium to promote solutions to high priority problems of human welfare in emerging market countries.

Issues covered during the last years include health, education, gender inequality as well as ageing (2015) and youth (2016).

This year’s Emerging Markets Symposium, chaired by former Pakistan Prime Minister, Shaukat Aziz and sponsored by the C&C Alpha Group, brought together 45 international experts and 14 graduate students from 20 emerging market and high income countries. Hosted by Green Templeton College on 7-10 January, the symposium was designed to ensure its conclusions were grounded in the insights and priorities of young people - more than a third of the participants were under 30.

ILC-GA’s co-President Dr Alexandre Kalache was invited to participate in his capacity as a newly appointed EMS Board member. Dr Kalache was invited as a participant to link this and last year’s themes and to ensure that the discussions include a life-course perspective.

http://ems.gtc.ox.ac.uk

http://ems.gtc.ox.ac.uk/content/young-people-and-future-emerging-markets

@EmsOxford

The International Longevity Centre-India (ILC-I) is the Satellite Centre of the United Nations’ International Institute on Ageing, Malta for the SAARC region.

This Satellite Centre, in collaboration with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai is organising the ‘in situ’ international training programme of UN INIA Malta, on “Social Gerontology” from the 11th to the 15th or April 2016 at the TISS campus in Mumbai.

TOPICS TO BE COVERED
The programme consists of lectures and  topics dealt with are: A global perspective on Population Ageing; Key concepts in gerontology; Social aspects of ageing; Economic aspects of ageing; Psychological aspects of ageing; Health aspects of the older persons; The Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (I): Older persons and development; The Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (II):   Health Promotion and wellbeing; Medical Conditions experienced by the Older Persons; Policies on older persons in India; Maintenance & welfare of parents / Senior Citizens Act of India 2007;  Feminisation of ageing; Intergenerational solidarity;  The Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (III): Ensuring enabling and supportive environments;  Active-ageing policies for low-income countries;  Caregiving of older persons; Communication with older persons;  Programmes and schemes for elderly in India; Social Policies and services in the community; Elder Abuse;  Quality of life in old age; Dementia & its implications on the individual and the family; Ageing and Disability; Healthy Nutrition in the elderly; Older Persons in the changing role of the family; Socio-economic implications of Population Ageing in India; National Minimum standards for care homes for older persons.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND THIS COURSE
Applications are invited from social workers, academicians, health professionals and others interested in the field of Ageing from SAARC countries.

More details about this programme are available on the ILC-I website - www.ilcindia.org

The deadline to submit responses to the questionnaire on best practices in the implementation of existing law related to the promotion and protection of the rights of older persons is 18 December 2015.

The Independent Expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons has been requested by the Human Rights Council resolution 24/20 to assess the implementation of existing international instruments with regard to older persons while identifying best practices and gaps in the implementation of existing law related to the promotion and protection of the rights of older persons and gaps in the implementation of existing law.

Pursuant to this request, the Independent Expert has prepared a questionnaire to identify best/good practices. The responses to the questionnaire, as well as the country visits undertaken will contribute to the comprehensive report of the Independent Expert that will be presented to the Human Rights Council in September 2016.

The Independent Expert persons requests inputs from Member States, international and regional organizations, civil society, associations of older persons, national human rights institutions (NHRIs), academia, research institutions, the private sector and others.

Please send your responses by 18 December 2015.
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/OlderPersons/IE/Pages/GoodPractices.aspx

The winners of the 2015 Age Smart Employer Awards (agesmartemployer.org) were announced today at a packed ceremony attended by experts in aging and employment, elected officials and a diverse set of New York City businesses and their employees.

ILC- France is proud to announce the launch of CLIC PREVENTION SANTE, an online health prevention tool for  all ages  developed by ILC France  and sponsored by KLESIA  ( pension fund ).

This digital tool is designed to provide tailored lifestyle and medical advices, according to gender, age and medical profile. These personalized recommendations target diseases for which preventive measures have demonstrated benefit.

The proposed  advices are based on the most recent recommendations of health authorities or medical associations. Consultation of this site is anonymous.

CLIC PREVENTION SANTE is available on computer, tablet or smartphone.

For more information, visit http://www.clic-prevention-sante.org/ or contact ILC-France.

See below for the CLIC PREVENTION SANTE flyer

Documents:

CLIC PREVENTION SANTE flyer (PDF)

Get the free PDF reader

This year’s celebration of the 25th anniversary of International Day of Older Persons (UNIDOP), in anticipation of the third United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III) to be held in 2016, focused on the impact of the new urban environment on older persons, as well as the impact of older persons on the new urban environment.

UNIDOP Event Programme 2015

One Year. One City. 20 Lives.
exceedingexpectations.nyc

The Columbia Aging Center has launched a digital narrative project, “Exceeding Expectations.”

It is a project led by the Center’s Dorian Block, a journalist, and Ruth Finkelstein, an anthropologist and health policy expert. The beautifully-illustrated content features stories about the daily lives of 20 New Yorkers over the age of 81 who are passionately engaged in their lives and communities. A 2-minute video may be viewed on the website and visitors are encouraged to sign up and follow new chapters in each person’s story appearing over the next many weeks.

Click here to learn more about the project.

The video is available to view below.

One year. One city. 20 lives. Follow along. from Dorian Block on Vimeo.

Last week, members of the ILC Global Alliance participated in a series of events organized by the International Longevity Centre - Brazil.

Before the Annual Meeting of the Global Alliance on the 23rd October, Presidents, Directors and other senior staff of most of the ILCs participated in the 10th Bradesco Longevity Forum in São Paulo and the 3rd International Longevity Forum in Rio de Janeiro.

The theme was Age-Friendly Initiatives - ranging from age-friendly cities to states, countries, businesses, universities, transport, media and much more. In three panels, the ILCs presented a variety of age-friendly initiatives, which will be featured on this website in the coming months.

Hearty Congratulations to Professor Julie Byles, Head of the International Longevity Centre-Australia, for being elected to the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

The Academy recognizes the opportunities that exist through health and medical research to achieve for Australia a world-leading, efficient and effective healthcare system. The Academy promotes the continued development of quality healthcare through research leadership, mentorship of future researchers and provision of expert opinion to the public and the government.

The Academy was established to provide an impartial and authoritative voice for healthcare, informed by best available evidence and expert advice from the best and the brightest in health & medical care.

It is indeed a moment of pride for the ILC-GA family to have in its midst Prof. Julie Byles who is recognized by the Academy as an “impartial and authoritative voice for healthcare”.

In Prof. Julie’s words, “I am very honoured to join this fellowship with some of Australia’s best health researchers and to have a chance to both enhance my own experience and skills, as well as an opportunity to contribute to Australia’s knowledge base – particularly concerning health services and care for older people.”

Kudos to you Julie for being accorded this honour.

The 3rd International Longevity Forum will be taking place in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) from October 21 to October 22.

This year’s theme will be Age-Friendly Initiatives and will range from age-friendly cities to states, countries, businesses, universities, transport, media and much more.

The Forum is organized by the International Longevity Centre Brazil, in collaboration with Bradesco Seguros and UniverSeg and is supported by ILC-BR’s partners Cepe, IVB and Femptec.

The programme counts on the contribution of a diverse group of experts from all around the globe, including representatives of the UNFPA, ILO and WHO as well as Presidents of the majority of other International Longevity Centres.

The Annual Meeting of the Global Alliance members will be held on the following day.

James Beckford Saunders is a new member of ILC- Australia, and is the CEO of the Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG), which is the administering organization of ILC-Australia.

He has twenty years’ experience in senior management roles in leading health and community not-for-profit and educational organisations.

His experience of issues related to ageing has come through population health approaches (both mental and physical) at beyondblue, Mental Illness Fellowship, Diabetes Australia and most recently at ReGen, the lead alcohol and other drug treatment and education agency of UnitingCare.

James has also worked at the University of Melbourne and lectured at Master, undergraduate and TAFE level at Swinburne University and RMIT. He has an honours degree, post graduate qualifications in marketing, management and an MBA.

We all extend a very warm welcome to Dr. James Saunders to the ILC-GA family.

Ambitious new agenda would end poverty by 2030 and universally promote shared economic prosperity, social development and environmental protection

 

The 193 Member States of the United Nations reached agreement today on the outcome document that will constitute the new sustainable development agenda that will be adopted this September by world leaders at the Sustainable Development Summit in New York.

Concluding a negotiating process that has spanned more than two years and has featured the unprecedented participation of civil society, countries agreed to an ambitious agenda that features 17 new sustainable development goals that aim to end poverty, promote prosperity and people’s well-being while protecting the environment by 2030.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the agreement, saying it “encompasses a universal, transformative and integrated agenda that heralds an historic turning point for our world.”

“This is the People’s Agenda, a plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind. It seeks to ensure peace and prosperity, and forge partnerships with people and planet at the core. The integrated, interlinked and indivisible 17 Sustainable Development Goals are the people’s goals and demonstrate the scale, universality and ambition of this new Agenda.”

Mr. Ban said the September Summit, where the new agenda will be adopted, “will chart a new era of Sustainable Development in which poverty will be eradicated, prosperity shared and the core drivers of climate change tackled.”

He added that the UN System stands ready to support the implementation of the new agenda, which builds on the successful outcome of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, and which, he said, will also contribute to achieve a meaningful agreement in the COP21 in Paris in December.

More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the Sustainable Development Summit at the UN headquarters in New York between 25 to 27 September to formally adopt the outcome document of the new sustainable agenda.

The new sustainable development agenda builds on the success of the Millennium Development Goals, which helped more than 700 million people escape poverty. The eight Millennium Development Goals, adopted in 2000, aimed at an array of issues that included slashing poverty, hunger, disease, gender inequality, and access to water and sanitation by 2015.

The new sustainable development goals, and the broader sustainablity agenda, go much further, addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development that works for all people.

The preamble of the 29-page text, “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” states, “We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet.” It continues, “We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind.”

Rio+20 and the intergovernmental process

At the Rio+20 Conference of 2012, Member States agreed to launch a process to develop a set of sustainable development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Development Goals have proven that goal-setting can lift millions out of poverty, improve well-being and provide vast new opportunities for better lives. It was agreed that the new goals would be global in nature and universally applicable to all countries while taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities.

The negotiations were co-facilitated by the UN Permanent Representative of Ireland, Ambassador David Donohue, and the UN Permanent Representative of Kenya, Ambassador Macharia Kamau, over two years. The inclusive and transparent consultations by Member States, with the strong engagement of civil society and other stakeholders, have served as a basis for the conclusion of the intergovernmental negotiations on the emerging universal and people-centred agenda.

Core elements of the agreed outcome document

The outcome document highlights poverty eradication as the overarching goal of the new development agenda and has at its core the integration of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. The emerging development agenda is unique in that it calls for action by all countries, poor, rich and middle-income. Member States pledge that as they embark on this collective journey, no one will be left behind. The ‘five Ps’—people, planet, prosperity, peace, and partnership—capture the broad scope of the agenda.

The 17 sustainable goals and 169 targets aim at tackling key systemic barriers to sustainable development such as inequality, unsustainable consumption and production patterns, inadequate infrastructure and lack of decent jobs. The environmental dimension of sustainable

development is covered in the goals on oceans and marine resources and on ecosystems and biodiversity, bringing core issues into the goal and target framework.

The means of implementation outlined in the outcome document match its ambitious goals and focus on finance, technology and capacity development. In addition to a stand-alone goal on the means of implementation for the new agenda, specific means are tailored to each of the sustainable development goals.

Member States stressed that the desired transformations will require a departure from “business as usual” and that intensified international cooperation on many fronts will be required. The agenda calls for a revitalized, global partnership for sustainable development, including for multi-stakeholder partnerships. The agenda also calls for increased capacity-building and better data and statistics to measure sustainable development.

An effective follow-up and review architecture – a core element of the outcome document – will be critical to support the implementation of the new agenda. The High Level Political Forum on sustainable development, set up after the Rio+20 Conference, will serve as the apex forum for follow up and review and will thus play a central role. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and specialized agencies will also be engaged in reviewing progress in specific areas.

Based on the outcome document, the agenda will include a Technology Facilitation Mechanism to support the new goals, based on multi-stakeholder collaboration between Member States, civil society, business, the scientific community, and the UN system of agencies. The Mechanism, which was agreed at the Addis Conference in July, will have an inter-agency task team, a forum on science, technology and innovation, and an on-line platform for collaboration.

The successful outcome of the Addis Conference gave important positive momentum to the last stretch of negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda. It is expected that the consensus reached on the outcome document will provide momentum for the negotiations on a new binding climate change treaty to culminate at the Climate Change Conference in Paris from 30 November to 11 December 2015.

The draft agreement can be found at https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015

For further information, please contact Sharon Birch, UN Department of Public Information.

1 212 963-0564, e: birchs@un.org and Francyne Harrigan, 1 917 367-5414 e: harriganf@un.org

Value-building of India’s greatest Resources- Children through VALUEDUCATION
                
There is a great difference in the situation of the elderly a couple of decades ago and that of today, not just in India, but the world over. Essentially, the family security net always took care of their elders, be they men or women, widowed or unmarried, with ailments and disabilities or merely frail with age.

But today the scenario has changed- the family structure has changed its face from being a joint family system to a nuclear set-up, where, the adult children move out of their parental homes out of compulsion or choice, dictated by the need for better opportunities or for independent living respectively.

A world where today, the traditional Indian values of respecting elders or caring for the elders in the family have become non-issues! Further still, the values of respecting women, simple and basic values of honesty, integrity, commitment, dedication, hard work, sincerity have all given way to dis-honourable trends of violence against women, disrespect towards elders, corruption, frauds and the like.

The most urgent and very vital need of the hour is- the rebuilding of the moral fabric of Indian society, to weave in those values of yore which would make every citizen of India proud to be an Indian and an invaluable global citizen of the world.

Values for a healthy society:

A society is what its children are! For after all the children of today are the adult citizens of tomorrow. In fact, today, one of our valuable resources in the country is our children. By grooming the young minds which are so malleable, so impressionable, in the right direction, and at the right time, we would be helping nurture a healthy and happy society for tomorrow.

Similarly we also need to recognize another valuable human resource of our society- our elders. Cherish your elders- they are a treasure-house of knowledge, wisdom and experience. An old African proverb says-“The death of an elderly man is like the burning of a library.”

The wisdom and knowledge of our elders are like the roots of a society. Cut away these roots and the tree falls, so also, when we deride or neglect an elder we are sawing off the very branch that we are sitting upon!

If we are able to impress upon our children the importance of being respectful towards our elderly, if we are able to set by example the need for being caring towards our seniors, we would be grooming a generation of adults who would be able to cherish and value these ancient mores.

Children learn fast when they are taught young. And it is necessary that we bring back the value system of yore which was healthy for the mind and soul of society.

So what better than to teach the young children, the importance of the elderly in our lives; to impress upon them that, ‘As you sow, so shall you Reap!’  Everyone grows old. So give respect and get respect. If the seniors of today are happy and can lead dignified lives, we can be assured that the children of today will also be the happy and healthy elders of tomorrow.

So to restore our Indian heritage, to bring back the spirit of wellbeing of our ancient Indian traditions, we have to cultivate our young Indian minds. We have to inculcate in them the fact that our elders are indeed the backbone of our society. The well-being of our elders is also the indicator of the health of our society.

The need of the hour is to bring back the moral values of respect, trust, honesty, ethical behavior, integrity, commitment, sincerity, dedication, decorum, dignity and decency into the moral fabric of the Indian ethos.  Respect for women, for elders, for truth, for honesty are the pillars of any civilized society! Losing sight of these is bound to lead to moral blindness and depravation in any society.

Objective of this initiative on “Valueducation of our Children”:

ILC-I believes in Productive, Participatory, Healthy, Qualitative Ageing.  The ILC-I initiative on “Valueducation of our Children” seeks the participation of senior citizens as voluntary teachers of ‘Valueducation”.

The participation of senior citizens or the older persons as volunteers under this project serves to highlight the fact that seniors are still productive, still capable of giving to society, and that age has in no way diminished their quality or their capacity of being positive contributors to the development of society.

This also ensures that seniors remain active and independent and in the process healthy and beneficially occupied (not in monetary terms, but in terms of qualitative work satisfaction).

At the same time the seniors are also carrying out a very important responsibility that has traditionally been theirs and which they have carried out appreciably- to inculcate amongst the youngsters, the old and cherished values that nurture a good society.

Methodology of the project:

ILC-I’s panel of voluntary senior citizens who are interested in interacting with school children, or those who have a special knack of building a rapport with these children, are engaged in this project. They may be retired school teachers, principals, professors, engineers, grandmothers or elderly housewives or from any other profession- the common objective would be to instill valueducation in the youngsters.

Schools, be they English or regional, convent or municipality, can be an integral part of this project. The children being covered under this project are from Standards 5 to 7.

At present, there is one session on ‘Valueducation’ on one day and after a day, the children are asked to write on one particular topic relevant to the elders for an essay competition.

Prizes are awarded to the best three essays in each Standard in each school.
An inter-school competition with elocution and group skits on identified topics is to be conducted at the end of the orientation and sensitisation phase.

The first programme under Valueducation 2015 :

The first school to be sensitized was the Sant Tukaram School.  Students of Standards 5th to the 7th were introduced to the values of respect, honesty, cleanliness, hard work, with the creative skills of Ms. Sunanda Kale, a retired teacher volunteering under this programme, on the 6th of July 2015.

A team of senior citizens who volunteered to be the mentors conducted this programme with ILC-I coordinators in five schools of the Pashan area in the city of Pune.  Nearly 1500 school children were imbibed with these values in the first phase of this programme.

Strengthening our value systems:

The International Longevity Centre-India proposes to be the leader in marking the road to recovery. Recovery of our rich and ancient value system through the rekindling of our young children’s minds!

ILC-I has created, through its panel of older persons who are volunteering under this project to inculcate values in school children, stellar examples of Productive, Participatory and Qualitative Ageing!

The world can see how our elders are still wanted and are not unwanted burdens, but the treasure-houses of knowledge, wisdom and learning.
Through this programme, ILC-I rekindles the lost intergenerational solidarity as it seeks to-

“Valueducate our children of today to be the dignified elders of tomorrow.”

 

At the Cota National Policy Forum on “Gender and Ageing- equity and diversity in later life”, hosted by COTA (one of the ILC-Australia members) on the 2nd of July 2015 at Canberra, experts spoke on what gender equity implies for older Australians and the policies needed to achieve this.

The forum placed gender at the forefront of policy considerations for older people in recognition of the fact that – ‘gender affects later life participation in work, access to superannuation, housing for the elderly and their role as caregivers.’

The Keynote Speaker, Ms. Renee Leon, PSM, Secretary, Australian Government Department of Employment, spoke about the need to promote the ‘silver economy’ and also to ensure the health and wealth of the older persons.

Ageism, that is discrimination against the older persons due to their age, is a very common attitude even in Australia. It needs to be stressed that the Government has to play a key role in bringing about an attitudinal change to this. The government must assist mature job seekers and encourage flexibility in the work-place to accommodate the needs of the older workers was the general consensus.

Research by ILC-I Australia’s Julie Byles, Tazeen Majeed & Hal Kending , shows that older women have more opportunities for part-time work than older men do.

Further, it also finds that childhood, socio-economic factors, education & marital status affect the employment patterns of women, while for men, marital status & informal care are the impacting factors.

The Australian superannuation policy stipulates around forty years of full-time work-- such a mandate is disadvantageous for women employees, as caregiving, family needs met by women in their earlier period, lessen the number of years of work eventually put in by them.

Certain solutions to redress this situation were also discussed at the forum including superannuation credits for caregivers who take time out of work.

The gravity of another issue discussed at the forum was – Older Australians, especially older women who face poverty & homelessness despite Australia having the highest median income in the world. A primary reason for this was the gender pay gap which puts older women who do not own their own homes at particular risk.

Shortage of affordable housing especially for the older persons (that is, age-friendly homes) and the concept of ‘ageing in place’ were also discussed at the forum.

In the final session on ‘Gender & Health’, Julie Byles spoke on the need to dwell on not just longevity, but healthy life-expectancy which actually determines the quality of life that older persons experience. Research data from the Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health reveal that older women live longer than older men, but more often with physical limitations.

Discussions also centred around needs of the older men, ageing experiences and concerns of women and men of the LGBT community were also highlighted.

The final recommendations that emerged from this Forum were that policies and services for older people have to be comprehensive, holistic and cannot be gender-discriminatory. This was important as such holistic policies helped shape the lives of all older men and women to be lived with dignity and qualitatively.

On July 15th, ILC-Brazil launched its new report entitled ACTIVE AGEING: A Policy Framework in Response to the Longevity Revolution at the occasion of the 6th meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group on Ageing at the United Nations in New York.

The launch was held with participation of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Permanent Mission of Argentina, the Permanent Mission of Canada, the Global Alliance of International Longevity Centres - and specifically ILC Canada -, the Global Coalition on Aging and the International Federation on Ageing (IFA). The launch was organised with the generous support from AARP. Alexandre Kalache, President of ILC-Brazil and Co-President of the Global Alliance opened the launch which was attended by about 100 persons by saying that he was not programmed to be here in 2015 as he was born in Brazil in 1945 when life expectancy was just 43 years.

With a broad scope and a focus on the determinants of active ageing, ACTIVE AGEING: A Policy Framework in Response to the Longevity Revolution examines ageing in the context of major contemporary trends, notably urbanization, globalization, growing inequities, feminization of ageing, migration, technological innovation and environmental and climate change. It also revisits the Active Ageing framework within the context of the evolving international momentum toward recognition and reinforcement of the specific human rights of older persons.

You can download the report and its executive summary from www.ilcbrazil.org

ILC Singapore organised an inaugural Ageing Research Forum 2015 on May 27, 2015 to share results and learnings from the evaluation conducted of various Tsao Foundation programmes and create a platform to improve and broaden practice for community-based research.

More than 80 participants from the academe, policy and practice were in attendance.

Presenters were researchers and Tsao Foundation staff who have collaborated on these programmes: the Self Care on Health of Older Persons (SCOPE), Hua Mei EPICC (Elder-Centered Programme of Integrated Comprehensive Care), Coaching and Counselling, WeCare, End of Life and the Citi-Tsao Foundation Financial Education Programme for Mature Women. These programmes showcased various research methodologies in collaboration with the academe, older people and community partners to bring about evidence-based advocacies on policy and practice.

The forum also aimed to create greater interest on ageing research through the Graduate Programme Researchers Panel. Two graduate students from SIM University presented their studies and benefited from feedback from various sectors.

Following is a brief description of the programmes and researches showcased at the forum:

Citi-Tsao Foundation Financial Education Programme for Mature Women
The Citi-Tsao Foundation Financial Education Programme for Mature Women equips women with critical life skills such as saving and planning for the long term, growing their small surpluses and negotiating for their financial options successfully. In partnership with the People’s Association Women’s Integration Network, the programme is offered in Community Clubs to reach out to women aged between 40 and 60 years old. The training sessions follow a framework that allows women to have an understanding of financial concepts; how these apply to their contexts; and learn financial management skills that they can practice.

A one-to-one matched case-control study of 1,360 participants was conducted in 2013 to determine if each participant’s financial knowledge and behaviour were different after completing the financial education programme. The programme has reached out to more than 2,000 women in Singapore and has since been adopted in Indonesia and Malaysia with the support of Citi Foundation and local programme partners. It is an initiative that brings attention and action on the issue of financial security among older women in both policy and practice–engaging community partners and policymakers in Singapore and the region.

Hua Mei Elder-centred Programme of Integrated Comprehensive Care (EPICC)
Hua Mei EPICC was launched on 12 April 2013 to help older persons who want to continue living in the community in spite of their multiple chronic medical conditions, physical frailty and weak family and social support network. In its essence, EPICC is team-managed, person-centered, integrated comprehensive care, with a day club programme. It is the only programme of its kind in Singapore to accept elders who do not have a dedicated caregiver at home. As such, it meets the needs of some of the most under-served older persons.

At the centre, where they spend 6 hours each programme day, participants receive medical and psychosocial healthcare and engage in physiotherapy and stimulating activities such as crafts and games. Their attendance at the day club supports person-centered care delivery. Participants also receive 24-hour medical emergency coverage and home-help when there are no alternatives.

EPICC’s three-year pilot programme started in 2011 and included a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess the service's medical and social impact.

Hua Mei Mobile Clinic End-of-Life Care Programme
Hua Mei Mobile Clinic is a team-managed multidisciplinary team serving homebound and frail elders who have difficulties accessing health and social care. Owing to its patient profile, a part of the team's work naturally includes palliative care. With Tote Board funding, the Clinic incorporated its end-of-life care procedures into a formal programme and examined its qualitative impact over three years, from 1 October, 2010 to 30 September, 2012.

The ultimate goal of the Hua Mei Mobile Clinic system of care is to enable comfort and peace in old age, whereby clients enjoy optimal health, dignity and a sense of security while living in their own homes, surrounded by loved ones, neighbours and friends. When the time comes, the older persons, with the Clinic as care-partner, can transit to a good death, which usually means dying at home, without any loss of comfort and peace.

‘Perception and experiences of counselling services among an elderly population’ (Hua Mei Counselling & Social Work Practice)
Counselling can help seniors cope with transitions and empower them with adaptive skills. However, counselling as experienced by seniors in Singapore is not well understood. This research examined the perceptions of seniors towards counselling, the counselling experience and best practices that would enhance counselling delivery to the elderly in Singapore.

This research study utilized a qualitative framework, and had three main components: 1) interviews with seniors who had not used counselling services 2) in-depth interviews with seniors who had received counselling services from Hua Mei Hua Mei Counselling & Social Work Practice and 3) interviews with counselors involved in the counselling of seniors.

Self-Care on Health for Older Persons in Singapore Programme (SCOPE)
The Self Care on Health of Older Persons in Singapore (SCOPE) is a community development programme that helps empower older people to practice self-care and manage chronic diseases better with the long-term goal of helping sustain good functional status and quality of life. The programme also aims to build their support system that will enable them to continue taking good care of each other over the long term.

SCOPE’s two-year pilot phase (2011 to 2013) was funded by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Education to test and evaluate the efficacy of a self-care approach. The randomized controlled trial was conducted by the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and ILC Singapore in partnership with 14 Senior Activity Centres in the Bukit Merah, Ang Mo Kio and Toa Payoh areas. SCOPE recently received a new three-year funding (2015-2018) to build the capacity of Senior Activity Centres, Wellness Centres and other relevant service providers to reach out to 1,200 older persons.

Working to Enhance the Care and Resilience of Elders (WECARE) Programme – Hua Mei Clinic
WECARE is a medical care pilot study on the prevention of disabilities among community-dwelling older persons. It was initiated in 2010 in a partnership between the Tsao Foundation and the Tan Chin Tuan Foundation. The study was completed in January 2014.

The pilot study sets out to define the components of medical care in a model of primary care as practiced at the Tsao Foundation’s Hua Mei Clinic. Its integrated multidisciplinary model is designed to address the complex medical and psychosocial needs of an aged population. Central to this model is an emphasis on prevention of disability through early detection and age/disease-specific interventions before complications develop.

Primary healthcare as practiced in Singapore tends to be episodic, fragmented and does not adequately address psychosocial complexities. The study aims to address some of these areas and contribute towards an improved comprehensive system of primary healthcare.

On the 15th June, member states of the Organization of American States (OAS) approved the INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION ON PROTECTING THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF OLDER PERSONS during the General Assembly of the institution, which was immediately signed by the governments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica and Uruguay at OAS headquarters in Washington DC.

Inter-American convention on protecting the human rights of older people

The 27th May 2015 saw the launch of ILC Canada at the University of Ottawa.

The launch was a great success with more than 160 attendees, and support from the Canadian Medical Association and the Eldercare Foundation of Ottawa. Margaret Gillis, the President of ILC Canada, was the MC for the event. The Minister Responsible for Senior, the Honourable Alice Wong, provided the welcoming remarks and ILC Canada Vice President, Gloria Gutman, delivered the keynote address on "Super Centenarians."

ILC Canada is housed at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Health Science and the Dean, Dr. Helene Perrault, spoke on the partnership. Notably, a description of Dr. Louise Plouffe and Dr. Kalache's work on Age-friendly communities resulted in a burst of applause from the audience. Dr. Kalache, Co-President of the ILC Global Alliance, sent a recorded greeting on behalf of ILC Global Alliance.

ILC Canada were honoured to welcome representatives from key Canadian organizations on aging and some of the Embassies and High Commissions of ILC Global Alliance members. Media were in attendance and below you will find the print and radio interview from the CBC:
http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2015/05/28/canada-now-has-its-own-international-longevity-centre

The symposium, to be held on 6th June 2015, will explore an increasingly influential view in Japan that preparing for one’s departure from life should be an integral component of one’s life planning.

The venue will be Yurakucho Asahi Hall. The symposium is over-subscribed and is expected to attract as many as 800 participants.

The presentations will include:

  • “Saying ‘farewell to life’ with dignity— implications for bioethics”  by Dr. Rihito Kimura, Professor Emeritus , Waseda University
  • “Taking personal initiative in  preparing for a farewell from this world – it is your responsibility, not someone else’s,” by Keiko Higuchi, President, Women’s Association for a Better Aging Society
  • “What everyone should and can do to prepare for a satisfactory life farewell,”  by Kanao Tsuji, MD, President, Life Care System, Ltd.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.ilcjapan.org/doc/tabidachi_sympo.pdf

As part of the General Assembly discussions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) the United Nations convened an “interactive dialogue with stakeholders” on March 25, 2015.

The objective of the dialogue is to provide an opportunity for stakeholders to comments on the targets and indicators suggested for the SDGs.

Margaret Gillis, President of ILC Canada, represented both the ILC Global Alliance and the “Stakeholder Group on Ageing”, an organization that advocates for older people’s rights at the UN and which represents the interests of more than 800 million older people globally.

The speech, which is found on the link below, focussed in on the glaring omissions in the indicators as they pertain to older people.  Noting that nearly 16% of the global population will be over the age of 60 by the time the SDGs are fully implemented, this intervention demonstrated that the current indicators would exclude older people from the important outcomes of the SDGs.

The speech cited explicit examples of the shortfalls of the indicators, such as Target 5.2 on sexual violence which limits data collection to ages 15 to 49.  This indicator perpetuates a long discredited notion that sexual violence is perpetrated only on women of childbearing age, and effectively ignores the most abhorrent forms of elder abuse.

The speech illustrated that the omissions did not reflect the UN principle of “leave no one behind,” the Chair of the UN sessions called the arguments “persuasive” and noted that the UN “are caught in the past”.

The ILC Global Alliance has a strong history in advocating for rights of older people and will continue to monitors the UN work on the SDGs to ensure the inclusion of older people in development.

The "interactive dialogue with stakeholders" is available to view here.

Margaret Gillis, President, ILC Canada

Several ILC representatives participated in the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), March 9-20, 2015, New York.

The session conducted a global review and appraisal of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and consider opportunities for strengthening gender equality and the empowerment of women in the post-2015 development agenda. 

The ILC Global Alliance was a signatory to the written statement entitled “Older women and Beijing: 20 years on,” submitted to the CSW59. It was also a co-sponsor of a side event, “Witchcraft Accusations, Violence, and Torture, Women and Children,” (March 11th). Silvia Perel-Levin (the ILC GA’s representative in Geneva), Masako Osako (Executive Director, Secretariat) and  Mari Hatashima (a volunteer) participated in the session.  For details on the session see http://www.unwomen.org/en/csw/csw59-2015.

Contributed by M. Hatashima and M. Osako

Nine International Longevity Centers participated in a panel presentation titled “Global Comparison on Healthy Aging” at the 4th Berlin Demography Forum: "Activity – Health – Participation" held in Berlin, Germany, March 18-20, 2015.

Organized by Prof. Axel Boersch-Supan (President of ILC Germany) and Prof. Ursula Staudinger (President of ILC USA), the panel was an occasion for  the first reporting on the ILC project “Health effects of retirement,” which  is analyzing  data from the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (“SHARE”) and equivalent national  and international  databases. The project aims to shed light on how early or later retirement affects health and wellbeing.

Moderated by Prof. Axel Boersch-Supan (Germany), the participating panelists included Mr. Brian Beach (UK), Dr. Sara Carmel (Israel), Dr. Lisa Susana Daichman (Argentina), Ir. Marieke, A.E. van der Waal (the Netherlands),  Dr. Didier Halimi (France), Ms. Jana Bakalova (Czech Republic), Dr. Sebastiana Kalula (South Africa), Ms. Susana Harding (Singapore), and Dr. Masako Osako ( Japan). Discussants were Dr. Alexandre Kalache (Co-President, ILC Global Alliance), Prof. Dr.Volker Deville (Allianz Deutschland) and Prof. Dr. K. Lenhard Rudolph (Leibniz Institute of Ageing Research). For details of the forum, please visit http://www.bib-demografie.de/SharedDocs/Termine/EN/2015/2015_03_18_bdf_2015.html.

Photography by Mr. Frederic Schweizer.

Age Smart Employer — an initiative of the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center— launched their Age Smart Industry Guides.

These five separate guides; Family-owned Business, Food Service, Manufacturing and Skilled Trades, Non-profit Organizations and The Advantages of Older Workers; are geared directly to small business owners, to provide them with peer-to-peer advice on solving some of their biggest staffing challenges by hiring and retaining older workers, and were gleaned from interviews conducted with 100 small business owners around New York City.

These guides are a resource intended to stimulate others to follow these leaders and to earn themselves an Age Smart Employer Award, an initative led by the Columbia Aging Center, in partnership with The New York Academy of Medicine (and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation). Although these guides are New York City specific, many of the tips, policies, and practices have wider applicability.

The guides have received some media coverage, with stories in Crain’s New York Businessand Huff Post.

For more information about Age Smart Employer NYC, please visit our website - www.agesmartemployer.org; and please follow us on Twitter at @ColumbiaAging and @AgeSmartEmploy.

How can societies meet the health, policy and economic challenges of global population ageing?

One in nine people in the world is 60 or older and this is expected to rise to one in five people by 2050. A globally ageing population and the associated demographic changes have wide-ranging implications for health systems, medical priorities, economic policies, and labour and consumer markets.

The certainty of global population ageing demands greater action, innovation, and a long-term approach from policymakers, health and medical professionals as well as businesses. This conference will address critical questions, including:

  • Are current health, public policy and economic responses to global ageing adequate?
  • How can health systems develop sustainable strategies to support an ageing global population?
  • How can the challenge of managing chronic conditions be met and at what cost?
  • How can societies address the financial impact of ageing populations?
  • Are businesses reacting quickly enough to an ageing workforce and consumer base?

Keynote speakers at this event include Dr Babatunde Osotimehin (Executive Director, UN Population Fund; Under-Secretary-General, United Nations), Laurence Rossignol (Minister of State for the Family, Elderly People and Adult Care, France), Simon Stevens (Chief Executive, NHS England).

We are delighted that Dr Alexandre Kalache, Co-President of the ILC Global Alliance, will be chairing the second session on Monday 9th February, focussing on Establishing Health Priorities for Ageing Populations.

For more information about the conference, and to register to attend, please click here.


The ILC Global Alliance are delighted to announce that Dr Alexandre Kalache and Baroness Sally Greengross have been sworn in as Co-Presidents of the ILC Global Alliance.

The announcement was made at the ILC Global Alliance Annual Conference in London in October 2014.

Dr Kalache, President and Founder of ILC-Brazil, is a specialist in age-related issues. Specifically, his expertise is in the epidemiology of ageing & the life-course, inter-sectoral policy development (including age-friendly initiatives), health promotion, old-age care, human rights and migration within the context of ageing as well as the more general cultural complexities of the world-wide longevity revolution. More information about Dr Kalache is available on the ILC-Brazil website.

Baroness Greengross, President and Chief Executive of ILC-UK, has been a crossbench (independent) member of the House of Lords since 2000 and chairs five All-Party Parliamentary Groups: Dementia, Corporate Social Responsibility, Intergenerational Futures, Continence Care and Ageing and Older People (Co-Chair). She is the Vice Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life, and is Treasurer of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Equalities. More information about Baroness Greengross is available on the ILC-UK website.

During the conference, Members of the ILC Global Alliance thanked Monica Ferreira, President of ILC South Africa, for her efforts and dedication as Co-President of the ILC Global Alliance from 2010 to 2014.

The International Longevity Centre - India (ILC-I) applauds those, who bring quality of life to the elderly, with its annual ILC-I Awards.

ILC-I Awards 2014

This lecture series had four lectures from the 21st of September 2013 to the 15th of January 2014, the anniversary of the detah of DR S D Gokhale. Two further lectures were held on the 22nd of October 2013 and the 4th of December 2013.

The Late Dr. S. D. Gokhale Memorial Lecture Series

ILC-UK were delighted to host the 2014 International Longevity Centre Global Alliance (ILC Global Alliance) Annual Conference in October.

 

 

2014 ILC GLobal Alliance Conference
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2014 ILC Global Alliance Annual Conference


ILC-UK were delighted to host the 2014 International Longevity Centre Global Alliance (ILC Global Alliance) Annual Conference in October.

The ILC Global Alliance is an international consortium of member organisations.

The mission of the ILC Global Alliance is to help societies to address longevity and population ageing in positive and productive ways, typically using a life course approach, highlighting older people's productivity and contributions to family and society as a whole. The Alliance member organisations carry out the mission through developing ideas, undertaking research and creating forums for debate and action, in which older people are key stakeholders.

The ILC Alliance currently includes centres in the United States of America, Japan, the United Kingdom, France, the Dominican Republic, India, South Africa, Argentina, The Netherlands, Israel, Singapore, Czech Republic, China and Brazil. These centres work both autonomously and collaboratively to study how greater life expectancy and increased proportions of older people impact nations around the world and seek to offer solutions to the challenges they bring.


During the conference, we were delighted to welcome three new centres to the alliance: Canada, Australia and Germany, bringing the membership to 17.


More information about the ILC Global Alliance and its members can be found on the ILC Global Alliance website: www.ilc-alliance.org

 
During the conference, we held a number of events:
At the Ageing Across the World dinner on Monday 27th October, kindly hosted and supported by EY, we heard from Silvia Stefanoni (HelpAge International) and Ben Franklin (ILC-UK).

Over table discussions we looked at global perspectives on ageing trends with each table focussing on a different region around the world; Africa, Asia, North America, South America and Europe.
The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society was held on Tuesday 28th October and was kindly hosted by Prudential and supported by Age UK.

The event was chaired by Axel Boersch-Supan (ILC-Germany), and we heard presentations from Christian Wolmar, Ian Pearson, Ruth Finkelstein, Geoff Green, and Sir Alan Greengross.

A number of important issues were identified during the event:


Transport is changing: change comes from a number of avenues; environmental, social, political, technological. There is therefore the potential for great improvements to the quality of life of older people as the new transport system which is developing could be designed to better cater to their needs. However, in many cases older people aren’t part of the debate about the future. Despite our ageing society, much of the investment in transport goes on large infrastructure projects, e.g. high speed trains and cross rail.

Conflicts of interest: whatever the area of change, we need to consider what the barriers to progress are going to be in terms of conflicts of interest or special interest groups and the huge costs involved in effective change.

ILC-UK now plans to develop some of the key ideas to come out of the event into a transport innovation workshop in January. This event will bring policy makers, transport experts and older people together to identify the changes that could, and should, be made to the UK transport system.

The presentation slides from this event are available to view
here.
As part of our annual conference, we held an internal joint meeting on the 28th October to discuss ongoing and completed research projects across the member organisations.

This meeting highlighted the success of a number of national projects in a range of areas, as well as updates on collaborative pieces that draw on the expertise and cross-national perspectives that make the Global Alliance such a valuable resource.

The meeting also featured a workshop to develop plans and strategy for a proposed joint project across the ILC members to explore the dynamics of retirement and health within the different social, political, and economic contexts of member countries.
The Post Development Goals 2015 dinner on the evening of the 28th October was supported by Age International. During the dinner we heard from Chris Roles (Age International), and Baroness Lindsay Northover (Lead Spokesperson for Department for International Development in the House of Lords) and Sir Malcolm Bruce MP (Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats).
On Wednesday 29th October we held a symposium on Ageing and Mobility, which was kindly hosted by the Local Government Association and supported by Alliance Boots.

This half day symposium showcased international research by ILC Global Alliance members on frailty and mobility in old age. The symposium was chaired by Louise Plouffe (ILC-Brazil), with presentations from Rosy Pereyra (ILC-Dominican Republic), Susana Concordo Harding (ILC-Singapore), Sebastiana Kalula (ILC-South Africa), Didier Halimi (ILC-France), Kunio Mizuta (ILC-Japan), Lia Daichman (ILC-Argentina) and Iva Holmerová (ILC-Czech Republic). Panel contributions were heard from Marieke van der Waal (ILC-Netherlands) and Jayant Umranikar (ILC-India).

The presentation slides from this event are available to view
here.
We were delighted to welcome the Secretary of State for Health, The Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, to the Taking Forward the G8 Dementia Challenge lunch reception on the 29th October. During the reception, we also heard from Eileen Sills, Clinical Director for London’s Strategic Network for Dementia.
The final event of the conference, held on the 29th October, was the Robert Butler Memorial Lecture. Robert Butler, founder of ILC-US, was a passionate believer in the importance of health and productive ageing

This years lecture was on Productive Ageing and was given by Dr Ros Altmann, government’s Business Champion for Older Workers. The event was kindly hosted by the Local Government Association and supported by Pfizer US.

Dr Altmann's presentation slides are available to view
here.
This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from EY, Prudential, Age UK, Bupa, Age International, The Local Government Association, Alliance Boots and Pfizer US; all of the excellent Speakers and Chairs; and of course the delegates who were able to join us at the events.
 
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Columbia Aging Center Director and President of ILC-USA, Ursula Staudinger, will deliver a plenary speech “Change and Growth – a Paradox?” at the Nobel Week Dialogue in Stockholm.

Columbia Aging Center Director and President of ILC-USA, Ursula Staudinger, will deliver a plenary speech “Change and Growth – a Paradox?” at the Nobel Week Dialogue in Stockholm on 9th December 2014, the eve of the presentation of the 2014 Nobel Prizes.

A day-long series of panels devoted to the topic of aging will provide new scientific and cultural perspectives on societies of longer lives. This Nobel Week Dialogue convenes distinguished participants from a range of disciplines including past Nobelists Elizabeth Blackburn, Aaron Ciechanover, Eric Kandel, Eric Maskin, Daniel McFadden, and Craig Mello.

For information about the December 9th event, please click here.

Dr. Rosy Pereya, President of International Longevity Center Dominican Republic, and the Dominican network for Dignity in Old Age, which she coordinates, celebrated WEAAD (World Elder Abuse Awareness Day) on June 15, 2014 in Santo Domingo.

The International Longevity Centre-India (ILC-I) organized a Mini Walkathon of senior citizens to mark the World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on the 15th of June 2014 in Pune.

Nearly 400 senior citizens participated in this Mini Walkathon which covered a stretch of nearly three kilometers. After congregating at a designated point, the senior citizens proceeded to walk towards the venue where a small programme was arranged by ILC-I.

The seniors, sporting specially designed T-shirts and caps, walked with great energy and enthusiasm, carrying placards with slogans like “Respect Elders, No Abuse”, “Elder Abuse is not just a crime, but a sin” and many more.

Many leading Puneites, who were senior citizens, walked the Walkathon. They included, besides the Chairman of ILC-I, Mr. Jayant Umranikar, the eminent orthopaedic surgeon of Pune, Dr. K. H. Sancheti, Air Marshal Bhushan Gokhale, retired Commissioners of Police among others. Some older persons over the age of ninety and quite a few over the age of eighty also participated in the Walkathon. Great energy and tremendous enthusiasm of the senior citizens were the hallmarks of this Walkathon.

The Walkathon terminated at the Law College Auditorium where the President of ILC-I, Dr. R. A. Mashelkar and Mr. C. S. Pathak, Hon. Director, ILC-I, welcomed the participants.

The programme began with a welcome address by Mr. Umranikar, felicitation of the sponsors and then the speech by the Guest of Honour, Dr. Sancheti. The Inaugural session came to a conclusion with the Presidential Address by Dr. Mashelkar.

After a short break for refreshments and breakfast, the leaders of the senior citizens’ organizations addressed the gathering. A short skit on elder abuse was also performed by senior citizens.

The programme ended with a thundering round of applause.

ILC-GA Symposiums

1. Rethinking Health and Health Care: Attitudes, Strategies and Challenges:

Chair and Discussant: Alexandre Kalache (ILC-Brazil)
Presenters
Daisuke Watanabe (ILC-Japan)
Sebastiana Kalula (ILC-South Africa)
Kavita Sivaramakrishnan (ILC-USA)


2. Financial wellbeing in old age - a global perspective from ILC-GA and HelpAge International

Chair: Mark Gorman (HelpAge International)
Presenters:
Jessica Watson (ILC-UK)
Alexandre Kalache (ILC-Brazil)
Mathew Cherlan (HelpAge India)


3. Aging in Emerging Economies: Comparative Policy Perspectives from Brazil, China, India and South Africa

Chair: Chris Gray (Corporate Responsibility group, Pfizer)
Presenters:
Kavita Sivaramakrishnan (ILC-USA)
Sebastiana Kalula (ILC-South Africa)
Alex Kalache (ILC-Brazil)
Du Peng (ILC-China)

 

Plenary talks by ILC-GA Leaders:

Speakers:

Dr. Mashelkar (ILC-India) - Keynote Speaker

Alexandre Kalache (ILC-Brazil) –Plenary Speaker

Alexandre Kalache (ILC-Brazil) - Keynote Speaker (Senior governmental Official Meeting: Presenting the ILC Brazil Rio Declaration, “Beyond Prevention and Treatment, Developing Culture of Care in Response to the Longevity Revolution.”

 

Sessions with ILC-GA presenters

Presenters:
Louise Plouffe (ILC-Brazil)
Representing Cristiane Brazil, Rio de Janeiro Municipal Secretary of Healthy Aging and Quality of Life:  “Older People in the Family: the elderly and their places”

Ruth Finkelstein (ILC-USA)

  1. Age Smart Employer Awards: “A New York Recognition Scheme for Employers who value workers of all ages”
  2. Creating age friendly cities and neighborhoods: Lessons from New York City
  3. Older adults and disasters: Findings from Hurricane Sandy

Anjali Raje (ILC-India)
Giving a presentation titled "Rights and Responsibilities of Older Persons- True Empowerment" at “Elder Abuse/Rights of Older Persons” Session.


Compiled by Dr. Ruth Finkelstein, ILC USA

As from the 4th June, when Noreen Siba retires, David Sinclair will lead the ILC-UK and take it to its next chapter.

David has been with ILC- UK for over five years and has shown great initiative, expertise and energy in his work with the organisation at all levels.

He is ideally suited to develop the ILC-UK and direct its work as we take on new challenges whilst retaining our key mission.

I will remain as Chief Executive, Sally-Marie Bamford is being promoted to Research and Strategy Director and Rhiannon Lavin is being promoted to Operations Director.

At this important stage we will appreciate all ongoing and new supporters in actively helping the ILC-UK maximise all the great opportunities ahead as it strives to become even more successful in solving the crucial challenges and demands of longevity and societal ageing.

Do contact David Sinclair in his new role - davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk

Baroness Sally Greengross

On May 12, 2014 The Czech Diaconia in co-operation with ILC-Czech Republic hosted an international conference Towards Integrated Services and Support for Aging in Community/Challenges and Ways Forward – Learning from International Experience.

The aim of the conference was to gather experiences and recommendations to support the development of integrated health and social support services for seniors in the Czech Republic. The conference was held as part of the project supported by the Swiss-Czech Cooperation Fund and the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic.

The conference featured leading experts in the field of health and social services from the Czech Republic and abroad, including several representatives of the GA ILC centres: Associate Professor Iva Holmerová, PhD, president of the ILC-Czech Republic, Professor Sara Carmel, MPH, PhD, President of the ILC- Israel, Professor Françoise Forette, Director of the ILC-France, and Noreen Siba, Managing Director of ILC-UK. Other speakers included representatives of the Ministry of Health (Professor Josef Vymazal, MD., PhD, Deputy Minister of Health and Mrs. Ludmila Vostřáková, Head of Health and Social Services Unit) and the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (Mrs. Zuzana Jentschke Stöcklova, Deputy Minister for Social and Family Policy), Kent Löfgren, Senior Adviser, Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Division for Family and Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden, Dr. Monika Roth, Director of the Centre for Prevention and Health Promotion, Gesundes Kinzigtal, Germany and Richard Humphries, Deputy Director for Policy, The King ‘s Fund, London (see the agenda, abstracts and CVs below). Other speakers from the Czech Republic were Zdeněk Kalvach, Geriatrician, Former Vice-president of the Czech Geriatric Society and Ladislav Průša, Director of the Research Institute for Labour and Social Affairs.

More information, a summary of the conference, the presentations and other materials may be viewed on the ILC-Czech Republic website.

Petr Wija

The International Longevity Center Global Alliance’s representative attended the 11th session of the Open Working Group (OWG) on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)-Post 2015 Agenda at the United Nations (New York, May 5-9) as a member of the Stakeholder Group on Ageing (SGA), a consortium of several major NGOs.

http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/owg.html

The purpose of the Sessions (a total of 13 sessions are taking place between March 2013 and July 2014) is to develop a set of Sustainable Development Goals to be considered by the General Assembly this fall as the UN’s post-2015 development agenda. Because these Goals will succeed the Millennium Development Goals set in 2000 and are expected to guide the UN’s effort for development, 2015-2030, they can have significant effects on the course of global development.

The conference was well attended, as shown by the conference photograph. Presentations by Member States and civil society groups were extremely varied in their assertions. A good deal of intense negotiation is expected to take place during this and other Sessions in order for  a final set of recommendations to be formulated by this fall.  The SGA’s importance is underscored by the fact that it is the only major participating NGO group whose main objective is to integrate ageing issues into the Goals so that older persons will not be “left behind” in the development process.

Masako Osako

TOP STORIES

The President of ILC-BR, Alexandre Kalache, is currently in Australia advancing the ageing agenda of the South Australian Government.

On Tuesday, October 24, 2017, the Columbia Aging Center celebrates the participants in its digital narrative project “Exceeding Expectations” (exceedingexpectations.nyc). 

The Columbia Aging Center has been following 20 older New Yorkers for two years with the aim of disrupting stereotypes of aging and portraying everyday life. Many of the 20 New Yorkers met for the first time on Oct. 24.

On October 17, ILC-BR organized a Symposium with three international speakers in São Paulo. The event took place in the auditorium of Iamspe (Institute for Medical Assistance to the Public Servant of the State of São Paulo).

On October 19 and 20, ILC-BR hosted the 5th International Longevity Forum in Rio de Janeiro. This year’s theme was the construction of resilience along the life course; a very timely topic given the ongoing crisis in Brazil.

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