ISSUES:

In an ageing world, the process and nature of retirement is changing. In most parts of the world, the next generation of retirees will be healthier, and will live longer, than any previous generation.

As a result, many older people are keen to continue in the workforce for longer; overcoming barriers to employment in later life is a key challenge for policy-makers throughout the world. However, the economic and fiscal implications of increased longevity means that many people will be compelled to retire later, as eligibility ages for pensions are increased to minimise both budget deficits and old age dependency ratios. Innovative forms of ‘gradual retirement’ may be necessary if inequitable social outcomes are to be avoided.

News

Age Smart Employer — an initiative of the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center— launched their Age Smart Industry Guides.

This lecture series had four lectures from the 21st of September 2013 to the 15th of January 2014, the anniversary of the detah of DR S D Gokhale. Two further lectures were held on the 22nd of

An ILC Global Alliance Circular on retirement age reform.

Reports

This think-piece looks to Hong Kong,  whose pension infrastructure is similar to the one emerging in the UK to examine the potential impact of the UK's recent pension reforms.

An ILC Global Alliance Circular on retirement age reform.

Older people aren’t always getting the most from their retirement savings, according to a new report, by Jackie Wells for the ILC-UK.

This ILC-France report describes demographic data and examines the causes of the increase in longevity and implications on working lives.